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Lord Of The Flies - Ralph Monologue

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Introduction

Lord Of The Flies Ralph Monologue (A boy stood adjacent to a fire on an island, looking resentful) Should never have let this happen. Should never have let this happen. (Ralph shaking his head) Jack's an idiot, bloody idiot. Divide and rule. What does he think he's playing at? Does nobody want to go home? I miss my family. Don't they miss theirs? I just can't understand (sighs). What's wrong with him? It's his fault we're still here on this stupid island. He should have watched the fire like we said, not disappear off into the jungle. Showing off, "I cut the pig's throat." So what. Who cares! We can all do that if we want to, anyone can be a hunter. ...read more.

Middle

He must have had rules at home. If only they'd obey the rules like they used to. (Reaches for the conch) The conch, obey the conch. That's what we had agreed, obey the conch! (Shaking his head) Piggy should have some ideas but he's lazy and weak. Jack scares him. Jack the bully. Jack the choirboy. Huh, Piggy scared of everything, everyone, useless. What's the point. Can't be bothered to do this anymore, can't Piggy do something for once. Let them rot. Let the beast kill them. Who cares, they can look after themselves. I'm not their parents. Let Jack be leader if he wants, I don't care. Then they can do what they want. ...read more.

Conclusion

Like I'm a criminal. School and lessons so boring. Tidy your room. Don't fight with your sister. Don't swear. Don't do this, don't do that. It's constant, she'd go on and on and on. Wish I was in Devonport, the wild ponies, the snow, the warmth of my bed. (Wipes a tear from his eye) Why is it that only I remember that we want to get rescued? Everybody else seems to have forgotten. They don't care. The idiots, can't they see we'll never survive if we don't stick together. We won't get rescued. The beast will kill us. It's all Jack's fault. Where's Piggy? (Looks around) To think I liked this island, at first. It's horrid. It's not exciting. I must get away. I hate it! I hate Jack, I hate all the bloody hunters. I hate this island. If only Jack had listened. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This monologue shows a clear understanding of how the boys would feel on the island and in particular the pressure Ralph may feel as chief. To enhance the impact of the piece linguistic devices could be used to heighten the description - particularly when describing the island, Ralph's home or Ralph's disgust about Jack. The structure of the piece could be changed to create a climax to the monologue where Ralph feels the most pressure and the highest point of tension is created for the reader.

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 10/04/2013

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