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'Lord of the Flies': Simon Essay.

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'Lord of the Flies': Simon Essay In this essay I will examine the character of Simon and his role in Lord of the Flies. Lord of the flies is the story of a group of public school boy that have been stranded on a desert island. This takes place in the backdrop of the cold war. The island is a microcosm within the macrocosm of the world beyond. At first it appears to mirror the outer world in some respect, but then the boys turn into savages. As the island represented the larger world, and as the island gets destroyed at the end of the story, it could be viewed that the book is suggesting possible world destruction. Simon's first appearance in Lord of the Flies is him fainting, probably from the heat. Because of this Simon appears to be a week character, who is not robust. For example " he smiled palidly" he is almost dazed after he faints. In the first chapter Simon is largely over looked and described as a weak boy; "He was a small, skinny boy, his chin pointed, and his eyes so bright they had deceived Ralph into thinking him delightfully gay and wicked.", this description as well as him fainting in his introduction makes him appear weak. Another thing that makes Simon look physically weak, at first impression is what Jack says when Simon faints; " He's always throwing a ...read more.


Ralph shows little imagination, dismissing the candle buds; this shows his lack of imagination. Later in the chapter, the boys see a pig, and Jack is not able to kill, it due to his macrocosm values, he is still humane and has not yet descended into savagery, although he wants to, as it would make him look powerful. Although Simon is in this scene, he is not involved with the pig incident, keeping his innocent record. Simon does not view the beast like the other boys on the island; he uses his spiritual side, to explore the possibilities. Not assuming it exists, and must, be killed or that it definitely cannot exist like Ralph or Piggy, he takes the view that maybe it does exist, but the beast is in them. In chapter three; Simon's behaviour is seen by the other boys as increasingly odd, as he goes into the woods, on his own at nights and doesn't mind being by himself. The beast does not scare him. This is because of his strong personality, and spiritual side. Simon has a deep understanding concerning the beast but is not able to put his ideas and emotions into words, so Golding provides them. The first real act of evil on the island occurs when Simon is sitting alone in the forest and he witnesses the killing of the sow. ...read more.


can say that Simon is a very important character in Lord of the flies because the novel is an allegory, each character signifies an important idea. I think Simon represents natural human goodness (which is killed off with Simons death, and the completion of the boys turning into savages), Ralph represents order, leadership, and civilization, democracy (which is ended with the smashing of the conch, and Ralph's downfall as leader); Piggy represents the scientific and intellectual aspects of civilization; Jack represents savagery and the desire for power; and Roger represents brutality and bloodlust and the desire for evil. Unlike the other kids on the island Simon acts morally not out of guilt or shame, but because he believes in its inherent value. He behaves kindly toward the younger children, and he is the first to realize the problem posed by the beast and the Lord of the Flies and, that the monster on the island is not some physical beast, but rather a savagery that lurks within each person. This idea finds representation in the sow's head and eventually stands as the moral conclusion of the novel. The main problem of the book is the idea of inherent human evil, and mans essential illness. Against this, Simon seems to represent an idea of essential human goodness. Yet his brutal murder by the other boys indicates the scarcity of that goodness amid an overwhelming abundance of evil. Simon Essay ...read more.

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