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Lord of the Flies - What factors lead to the island community becoming increasingly dystopian by the end of Chapter 5 and how does William Golding present these?

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Introduction

What factors lead to the island community becoming increasingly dystopian by the end of Chapter 5 and how does William Golding present these? A desert island becomes the perfect place to observe William Golding's much disputed portrayal of human society, when a plane-full of boys crash and begin to wreak havoc. The island itself seems a utopia, with everything the boys could ask for, until civilisation starts fading from their minds and the island begins to take its own revenge. The title of the novel comes from the Arabic for one of the manifestations of the Devil. Baal-Zebub - or Beelzebub - means 'lord of the flies'. In the novel, the pig's head on a stick, covered in flies, is a horrific symbol of how far the violence has come. The pig was killed by Jack and his hunters and the head is put on a stick as an offering to the 'beast'. Only Simon really appreciates that the 'beast' is actually the evil inside the boys themselves and it is that which is breaking things up. So, the title of the novel reinforces the idea that we all have something of the 'devil' within us - and that the 'devil' can be released all too easily. 'Lord of the flies' examines reality and deception and points to the terrifyingly large gap between these two states. The novel opens with the chapter name "The Sound of the Shell". This paints a dramatic picture of something responding to something else, the something else being the sound of the shell. As readers, we have yet to know what responds to it, and yet we can already deduce that the shell is a conch shell, the only shell which can be played musically. However, upon further research, one can find that to be able to play a conch horn, the shell needs to be pre-prepared by having the middle section knocked out. When Ralph first meets Piggy, he manages to play the conch without doing so. ...read more.

Middle

one side of the island at midday, his behaviour startling Ralph so much that Ralph is led to believe that there is a ship near the island. Ralph thinks in the long-term, about how to get rescued. Jack is also very unkind to several members of the eventual tribe. This first sign of this is when Jack says "Shut up, Fatty" to Piggy, which is a cruel and dismissive act. It shows Jack trying to prove his authority by bullying the easiest and weakest target, in this case, Piggy. Jack's assertion of authority on the island means he can order around his "band" to help his role-play his fantasies from books like Treasure Island. His physical malformation is a factor in his quest to prove himself by lording over people. When the meeting is first called, one by one, the children appear out of the jungle. The smaller and younger boys appear to have been stuffing themselves with fruit. When the first boy, Johnny, sits down in front of Ralph, the other also copy him, like sheep. It is something they are familiar with, a civilised action which reminds them of school being schoolchildren. The difference between different types of leadership are highlighted in this section "what intelligence had been shown was traceable to Piggy while the most obvious leader was Jack... there was the conch" It shows again Golding's influence from World War Two. The word "Wacco." shows the boys think that the exploration of the island is fun, they see no danger in exploring an unchartered island, like a game. The words "Wizard" and "Smashing" also show this, but also makes the reader note the use of dated slang, which identifies the boys and middle-class public or private schoolboys. The feeling of ownership is shown " The great rock loitered... smashed a deep hole in the canopy of the forest... the forest further down shook as with the passage of an enraged monster... ...read more.

Conclusion

Part two, threat and fear appear on the island, begins with the arrival of the dead parachutist - fear becomes real and is a physical threat. Destruction occurs, which is caused by the boys' actions. The fire leads to one boy presumably dying, the conch is smashed, the glasses smashed and Piggy murdered, which illustrate the failure of democracy. There is the beginning of the idea that everyone has evil within them. For example, Simon's realisation that, "What I mean is... maybe it's only us". Evil has now been created on the island - this fact is established with the killing of Simon. If the reader is careful, they may notice that the parachutist disappears - he is no longer needed to symbolise evil. Part three, the consequences of creating evil, is where moral anarchy is released by the murder of Simon. Rule and order is destroyed - this is signalled by Piggy's death, the torture of Samneric, the hunting of Ralph and Ralph's will to kill or be killed. The boys lose their individual identities and become a mass or mob, for example, Jack loses his name and simply becomes "the Chief". This part also strongly highlights that the events are not a dream. This is made clear when the naval officer appears to remind the reader and the boys how far they are from the normal expectations of British public school boys. It is underlined by Ralph's own realisation about the loss of innocence and the darkness of men's own hearts. The only hope by the end of the novel is that Ralph and the others will have learnt something from their experiences on the island. The hope is that they will carry this knowledge back to civilisation and save it from itself. There are seven underlying themes in the novel; War, Violence, Things breaking down, Relationships, Fear, Democracy, Power, and the Lord of the Flies. They are the most significant factors leading to the island community becoming increasingly dystopian. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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