• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Lord of the Rings: Adaptation Evaluation

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Lord of the Rings: Adaptation Evaluation Plan: Intro: LOTR Background Changes: Tom Bombadil: Add sense of mysteriousness. Boromir's confession: Proud, arrogant warrior The "Spirit" of LOTR: Was it kept? Improvements. A new power has arisen. All must unite or fall divided. This is the story of the Lord of the Rings. The ring of power, forged in secret by the dark Lord Sauron contained all of the might, malice and power of the Dark Lord. Its wearer would be invisible and almost invincible, but it would corrupt the heart of anyone who wore it. Lord of the Rings is a typical good vs. evil story. This time, however, good is losing badly. The Dark Lord's forces will soon overcome all of Middle Earth, but there is one glint of hope for the forces of Good. ...read more.

Middle

In the film, the plot is changed so that Boromir does try to take the ring, but he confesses everything. This was a major change as Boromir is meant to be a proud and arrogant human - the author J.R.R. Tolkien always shows most humans as easily corrupted. A large omission was Tom Bombadil. He was a "father of the forest" type man who has powers of song and looks after the ring bearer. Tolkien added him to add a sense of mysteriousness to Lord of the Rings - nobody knew who he was or where he came from. This was missed out in the film. Characters like him really did help the spirit of Lord of the Rings. Form one point of view; the film did not keep the spirit of Lord of the Rings at all. Parts were missed out and some of the film seemed like a traditional Good vs. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because films need a great plot to be good, the director (Peter Jackson) has taken the good parts and made them great - he has really concentrated on the right parts. The film however was a bit too different from the book at times and too close at others. For example, there is an "I'm dead, oh no I'm not" scene part which was fine in the book, but should have been changed in the film. Another change that should have taken place was the fact that elves are shown as a dying any fading race in the Lord of the Rings film. In the book, elves couldn't die and the elves simply were leaving the land, not dying out. This was probably shown to make humans seem better. In conclusion, the Lord of the Rings film made great use of an excellent plot and unusual story. I think that the film was very good, but there was a small amount of room for improvement. Gopal K Kotecha ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE JRR Tolkien section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE JRR Tolkien essays

  1. What factors define a person's identity in The Hobbit? Do individuals have any power ...

    Bilbo's responsibility as person in charge without bitterness or any sort of arrogance. However, just as Thorin's character was developing and he was starting to become rather likeable, he changes dramatically to the worse. Overcome by greed, he becomes dictatorial, harsh, and hardhearted.

  2. Knights in the Middle Ages.

    I think that the idea of chivalry is very strong her but in different ways. Palamon is true to himself and his love for this woman. Arcite is honorable before anything else. He chooses to win the fight and get the girl as a consolation.

  1. The Hobbit

    " So began a battle that none had expected; and it was called the battle of Five Armies, and it was very terrible" (P. 292). Thorin sent for his cousin, Dain, who came in a hurry along with 5,000 soldiers.

  2. Lord of the rings: The fellowship of the ring

    Wizards: Gandalf is a wizard which he represents good but Saruman is also a wizard but he has joined forces with evil. Men: these all represent good but there minds are easily drawn in to the power of the ring as seen in the prologue.

  1. How do the makers of Shrek use presentational devices to reverse the tradition, to ...

    The film makers use music and sound effects to help get across how the characters are feeling e.g. sad feelings they use slow, lonesome music and happy feelings they use fast, exciting music. Donkey is one of the most important characters because through him we understand what Shrek is really.

  2. How does "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Rings" use techniques ...

    The voice over featured at the beginning has many aspects that one may find intriguing, such as the fact that it is a female voice. This creates an air of warmth and almost recognition between her and the audience, hence a feeling that the viewers have been invited into the world of Middle Earth.

  1. In the Grimm fairytale "The Lady and The Lion," L. Frank Baum's fantasy work, ...

    He fools everyone around him, even his subjects with his flashy props and his carnival talents into thinking that he is all mighty and powerful when really, as he puts it, "I am just a common man," (Baum 158). Not surprisingly, when Dorothy and her companions approach him and ask

  2. Life and Times of J.R.R. Tolkien.

    Many critics believe the character Frodo Baggins in The Lord of the Rings is symbolic of Tolkien and his war experience. Both seem to have been aimlessly caught up in a bad situation, which came to them without any warning.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work