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Macbeth

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Introduction

MACBETH COURSEWORK INTRODUCTION Alan Rickman We at sdk studios are delighted to inform you that you have been chosen to play the part of Macbeth in our production of the Shakespeare tale, Macbeth. We hope you will be able to play the part of Macbeth during are filming in the Autumn of 2002. Now, on to the play. The story of Macbeth was taken from real life, as were many of Shakespeare's plays. Macbeth, who died August 15, 1057, near Lumphanan, Aberdeen, Scotland. He was the King of the Scots from 1040, the legend of whos life it was that Shakespeares play, Macbeth, was based upon. It is thought that Macbeth was the grandson of King Kenneth II (ruled 971-995), and he married Gruoch, a descendant of King Kenneth III (RULED 997-1005). About 1031, Macbeth succeeded his father, Findlaech, as chief in the area of Moray in northern Scotland. Macbeth claimed the throne after killing his cousin King Duncan I in battle, with the help of Banquo, one of Macbeths allies and a close friend. near Elign. Not, as in Shakespeare's Macbeth, by Murdering Duncan in bed. Both Duncan and Macbeth derived their rights to the throne from their mothers. Duncans sons, Malcolm and Donald had fled in 1042. Malcolm to Cumbria and Donald to a remote part of Ireland. ...read more.

Middle

This space will of course be cheaper. Shakespeare used to charge a penny for this standing area which was about 1/2 of the weekly wage for a skilled worker. Then there will be the raised platforms between the standing area and the balcony's. These would cost about two-pence and were for the fairly rich. Then behind that, there will be the balconies These were 31/2 pence and were for the nobles. The only thing better than that would be the boxes with a roof and glass with a square cut out of the middle to look through. These would have cost about 5 1/2 pence. We will try to recreate this as faithfully as possible but as we said, on a much bigger scale. As you have probably already guessed, going to the theatre in Elizabethan times was a very big deal and it is estimated that about one fifth of the London city population went to the theatre regularly. This was probably because there were not many other forms of entertainment with no t.v or radio or arcades or anything like that. We will also try and do the play with no artificial lighting and see how it works out. This means starting in the early afternoon, which in turn will mean getting up very early for rehearsals, which we hope will not be a problem. ...read more.

Conclusion

It would have been almost impossible to imagine, if it wasn't for Shakespeares use of imagery. He would use imagery in all sorts of situations to liven up the performance and paint pictures in the audiences minds, just to make the action a little clearer for them. Now, for the character you are going to play, Macbeth, has a very strange and twisted relationship with people. His relationship with people is just about summed up with one quote. "Look like th' innocent flower,/ But be the serpent under't". This is said by Lady Macbeth, who we will speak about later, in act 1, scene 5 and it basically means that Macbeth should be two-faced to the extremity, this is what we are looking for from you. But there is also a nervousness in your approach, and a constant battle with your consciences, this is shown throughout the play up to the murder of Duncan, after that, Macbeth seems to have his conscience cleared and him and Lady Macbeth switch roles, but this is not particularly important in your portrayal of the scenes I will be directing you for. As you have probably discovered from this letter alone, Macbeth is a very complex character and could be played in many different ways, I will now go on to show you how we, at SDK enterprises, wish you to play Macbeth. ...read more.

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