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Macbeth. Act V. Sc. 5 The theme of this passage is Macbeth's realization that his disruption of the natural order will soon right itself and that the witches' prophecies are coming true, just not in a way Macbeth had originally believed.

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Introduction

Sam Greenblatt "If thou speak'st false, Upon the next tree shall thou hang alive, Till famine cling thee. If thy speech be sooth, I care not if thou dost for me as much. I pull in resolution, and begin To doubt the equivocation of the fiend That lies like truth. 'Fear not, till Birnam Wood Do come to Dunsinane,' and now a wood Comes toward Dunsinane. Arm, arm, and out! If this which he avouches does appear, There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here. I 'gin to be aweary of the sun, And wish th' estate o' th' world were now undone. Ring the alarum bell! Blow wind, come wrack, At least we'll die with harness on our back." - Macbeth. Act V. Sc. 5 The theme of this passage is Macbeth's realization that his disruption of the natural order will soon right itself and that the witches' prophecies are coming true, just not in a way Macbeth had originally believed. ...read more.

Middle

Similar words are spoken in Act 4, Scene1, when the child-like apparition, carrying a tree, confronts Macbeth. The figurative aspects of nature can also be seen throughout the play, particularly in the words of Macbeth. In Act 2, Scene 3, Duncan's wounds are described as, "...gash'd stabs look'd like a breach in nature...". This line not only refers to literal wounds, but in a greater sense refers to the wound caused by Macbeth when he killed his benefactor. Another example is in Act 2, Scene 4, when Ross is speaking to an old man, "...by the clock, 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the traveling lamp...". To this the old man replies, "'Tis unnatural, Even like the deed that's done". In my passage, Macbeth wishes the end of the world, but foreshadows the end of his world.The return to order is demonstrated in the final scene when Malcolm says, "What's more to do, Which would be planted newly with the time...". ...read more.

Conclusion

An example of personification in my passage, "...hang alive, Till famine cling thee", is famine which to the best of my knowledge cannot cling. Apostrophe is when one speaks to something or someone that is unable to respond, such as in my passage when Macbeth says, "Blow, wind! come, wrack!". Another example is in Act 2, Scene 1, when Macbeth exclaims, "Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell...". Duncan is not present to respond.. In my passage there are two paradoxes, "...lies like truth", and "There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here". A famous paradox, in this play occurs in Act 1, Scene 1, when the witches say, "Fair is foul, and foul is fair...". The play Macbeth is full of ironies, because one irony spawns another. In my passage, "And wish th' estate o' th' world were now undone", is a dramatic irony because Macbeth is wishing for the destruction of order on earth, yet he is unaware of his own imminent demise. ...read more.

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