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Macbeth, by William Shakespeare, my impressions of Macbeth, was that he was a man who had been pushed into killing people by his power-crazed wife.

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Introduction

Macbeth Coursework When I first read the book of Macbeth, by William Shakespeare, my impressions of Macbeth, was that he was a man who had been pushed into killing people by his power-crazed wife. In the film though, my impressions change as a lot of the killings his wife does not know about. As the film begins there is complete silence! This leaves the audience in suspense about what happens next. We then hear music, which makes us immediately think "spooky." Then we hear grunting and shouting and see bodies lying on the beach. Again the music becomes spooky! We then see Macbeth and Banquo riding on horses. They then arrive at the witches cave and the witches tell Macbeth "All hail Macbeth, Hail to thee Thane of Cawdor. All hail Macbeth, Hail to thee king thereafter" They also tell Banquo that his sons will be king. Macbeth and Banquo laugh the predictions off but we know by Macbeths face that this is not the last time that he will think of this. When Macbeth and Banquo are riding home, Ross comes along and tells Macbeth that he has been made the Thane of Cawdor. ...read more.

Middle

Before Macbeth kills Duncan, wee see the effectiveness of the special effects as he hallucinates and sees a dagger in front of him-it is leading him to Duncans bedroom. Macbeth enters Duncan's room and his first reaction is to cover Duncan's mouth and kill him-so that is what he does. Duncan's crown falls to the floor and we know that Duncan's kingship is over. When Macbeth comes back to his chamber he realises that he forgot to leave the daggers in the room, but as he is regretting what he ahs done, he tells his wife "thous't cant look upon what thy dons't." In the book we think that the killings do not change Macbeth but in the video we see that he is deeply regretting what he has done. Macbeth hears a knock at the door and shouts "wake Duncan with thy knocking" then aside he says "I would if thy coulds't." It is Macduff at the door. He is here to waken Duncan but as he comes out of Duncans room he shouts "Horror, Horror." He has found Duncan's corpse. To pretend to be in a fury Macbeth kills the two bodyguards, which is ironic because he was the one who killed Duncan. ...read more.

Conclusion

His immediate reaction is "she should have died hereafter." This is a very ignorant reaction as Macbeth has lost everything in his life close to him. He is so involved in his own tyranny that he doesn't realise that. Malcolm tells Siward and Macduff to go into the castle and find Macbeth. Siward is the first to fight Macbeth but Macbeth kills him. He declares over the body "thous't was born of woman." Macduff stands up and tells him that he was born by caesarean section. Macbeth is horrified by this but vows to fight Macduff. The audience sees that Macbeth doesn't want to give up his reign as he stops fighting to put his crown back on. Macduff strikes Macbeth in the arm. He knows now that his kingship is over. He tries to stumble up the stairs but Macduff cut Macbeths head off. The tyrant is now dead. In the video, Macbeth was portrayed as a man who was unsure of who he was. He had listened to his evil wife and his whole life has changed. I expected Macbeth to be a man who thought only of himself and in the video I saw this was true especially at the time of Lady Macbeths death. For me, Macbeth was not what I had expected Laura Mc Elroy 12A ...read more.

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