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Macbeth Look closely at Act 3 and scenes 3 and 4. How is tension created in these scenes?

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Introduction

Essay on Macbeth Look closely at Act 3 and scenes 3 and 4. How is tension created in these scenes? Macbeth wants to kill Banquo because Macbeth wants to rule over the country and get the attention from the people who appreciated Duncan. Macbeth wanted the crown and he wanted to be famous and powerful like Duncan. Lady Macbeth persuaded Macbeth and she planned that they will rule. Her plan works successfully. It does not take him long to submit to Lady Macbeth's taunts, even thought they were too harsh. By the end he had taken over the planning himself. Macbeth had killed Duncan because he wanted to rule. But when the witches told Macbeth, that Banquo would become the ruler, so he planned to kill Banquo. ...read more.

Middle

The tension is created more when Fleance escapes. This is where the tension grows more because Fleance had escaped and there is fear of Macbeth getting into more terrible traps. 'Fly, good Fleance, fly, fly, fly!' This is said by Banquo telling Fleance to escape. As he is stabbed by the murderer but he is still trying to save his son. But the son wants to save his father but he can't and he escapes. The murderers are more in tension. 'There's but one down, the son is fled.' In scene four the atmosphere is very enjoyable and celebration is on until the murderer had arrived. As the murderer tells Macbeth the news Macbeth is sick with worry and guilt about Banquo's murder. This is where the tension starts to create again. There is an atmosphere of fear. Macbeth's confidence disappears when he finds that Fleance had escaped. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Sit, worthy friends. My lord is often thus, And hath been from his youth. Pray you, keep seat. The fit is momentary: upon a thought he will again be well. If much you note him you shall offend him and extend his passion.' As the ghost of Banquo is seen Macbeth goes mad. The tension is created of suspicious. The guests are confused and perhaps very suspicious. Lady Macbeth had become very embarrassed by her husband's behaviour. She tries to control him. By the end of the scene, The tension had grown between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Macbeth decides to visit the witches again. ' I will tomorrow (And betimes I will) to the Wierd Sisters: More shall they speak; for I am bent to know, By the worst means, the worst.' This is a real turning point. It's as if he gives up trying to control things, and makes up his mind to go back to the witches. ...read more.

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