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Macbeth shows deception and betrayal undermine society

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Introduction

Macbeth shows deception and betrayal undermine society The play 'Macbeth" written by William Shakespeare" not only shows us how betrayal and deception undermines society but how it restores the moral law and society back to the way it was before the Thane of Cawdor and the tyrant Macbeth brought about the destruction in the first place. the play Macbeth also featured two changes to the throne of Scotland, both as a result of betrayal, deception, the aid of the weird sisters and the death of kings, the fate of Scotland changed for better and for worse. Deception and betrayal is apparent right from the beginning of the play where Duncan states that "No more that Thane of Cawdor shall deceive / Our bosom interest," and the terrible state that Scotland is in as a result of the Thane's betrayal along with the rebels. ...read more.

Middle

Nevertheless, once the King had been killed and Macbeth had taken his place, Scotland fell into disrepute with Macbeth's treason the reason that he had completely undermined society. Talk of Macbeth's treachery and its impact on the society was followed after Banquo's death, when Ross informed Macduff and Malcolm that "O nation miserable" and that "It cannot / Be call'd our mother". The great deceit of Macbeth was illustrated as resulting in "sighs and groans and shrieks that rend the air" and Scotland was said to be "the dead man's knell." At this point in the play, the fear and common place of betrayal was in every characters' mind and this was exemplified when Macduff's son says that "there are / liars and swears enough to beat the honest men and / hang them up." Although king, Macbeth still sought advice from the "weird sisters" in order to ascertain his future. ...read more.

Conclusion

"No more that Thane of Cawdor shall deceive / Our bosom interest," "There's no art / To find the mind's construction in the face: / He was a gentleman on whom I built, / An absolute trust." "worthy Cawdor". "look like the innocent flower, / But be the serpent under it." "Duncan / Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been / So clear in his great office" "the sightless couriers of the air, / Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye" "O nation miserable" "It cannot / Be call'd our mother". "sighs and groans and shrieks that rend the air" "the dead man's knell." "there are / liars and swears enough to beat the honest men and / hang them up." "oftentimes, to win us to our harm, / The instruments of darkness tell us truths, / Win us with honest trifles, to betray us / In deepest consequence." ...read more.

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