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Macbeth: the morning after Duncan, the king, has been murdered Lennox and Macduff arrive at Macbeth's home to collect t

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Introduction

Macbeth coursework Macbeth: the morning after Duncan, the king, has been murdered Lennox and Macduff arrive at Macbeth's home to collect the king. When Macbeth is speaking to Lennox and Macduff, Macbeth isn't saying enough to make them feel welcomed at his home. Macduff is polite and asks whether the king is awake yet and Macbeth answers with "not yet" suggesting that he is not in the mood for talking. He is probably extremely nervous at the moment in time and is pale and sweating a lot. He is also not talking much because he is thinking of what will happen when they find the king. "Will they blame him? What is he going to do if it is him?" In Shakespeare's writings he uses ten syllables in every line but in the case of Macbeth, he uses stichomythias, which are short broken lines. When Macbeth is transporting them to the king's room he says "the labour we delight in physics" which is an old proverb. He uses this because he is so nervous and he can't think of anything to say, so he says a proverb which isn't his own words. ...read more.

Middle

Banquo decides to set up a meeting and Macbeth is not keen on this idea so he says "let's briefly put on manly readiness" because he is trying to by time because he doesn't want to be found out. Lennox: Lennox greets Macbeth in any normal way because he doesn't know that the king is dead yet. He is trying to compose a conversation with Macbeth but he feels unwelcome because Macbeth isn't saying much. Lennox then speaks of what had happened that night on the weather "where we lay, our chimneys were blown down" and "strange screams of death" talking about a bad omen of nature, meaning that in that time they thought that if the weather was extremely bad something bad was going to happen. Bad weather has also occurred in Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" just before he dies. Another omen that is in Macbeth and Julius Caesar is "the obscure bird (M)" and "Hooting and shrieking (JC)" which is an owl of the night. Macduff is saying that the king is dead and Lennox says a genuine "what's the matter?" because he, unlike Macbeth doesn't know about the king being murdered. ...read more.

Conclusion

Banquo: when Banquo is first told of the murder he reacts with shock but disbelief and he says "I prithee contradict thyself, and say it is not so" meaning that he wants Macduff to say that he is actually alive and it was all just a joke. Banquo takes control at the end because Macbeth isn't doing anything and he organizes a meeting because he thinks the guards weren't the murderers and he doesn't believe Macbeth's story. This is because he is thinking back to when him and Macbeth when to the witches. Banquo doesn't believe Macbeth's story when he says "undivulged pretence" and that's why he organizes a meeting. Donalbain and Malcolm: They first come in taken aback because their father has just been murdered and they use stichomythia and are probably pale with grief and they can only ask, what happened and who did it. Later on they speak quietly to each other because they have suspicions that Macbeth has killed their father, because they are saying that if you are genuinely shocked then you wouldn't talk much but Macbeth is speaking a lot so he mush be in on it. So they decide to go to different countries because they are scared of being killed themselves and they think the murderers are still alive. ...read more.

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