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Macbeth, The sleepwalking scene (Act V scene I): A Dramatic Analysis.

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Introduction

The sleepwalking scene (Act V scene I): A Dramatic Analysis Act V scene I, the sleepwalking scene is a vital part of the play "Macbeth". It shows Lady Macbeth in a completely different light. The previous time we saw Lady Macbeth, in Act 3 scene IIII, she seems completely normal and not mentally disturbed by the King's murder however, in this act, wee see the really Lady Macbeth. She seems to act a huge amount playing a number of roles such as: when the king comes to stay, she plays the hostess, and when Lady Macbeth is convincing Macbeth to murder the king, I believe she is playing the devil. During this scene, Act V scene 1, Lady Macbeth reminds the audience about what has happened during the play so far. Near the end of the last scene, Act IIII scene III, Malcolm is talking to Macduff and he says, "The night is long and never finds the day." ...read more.

Middle

Also she is still worried bout the dark, in the scene you see her carrying a candle and she also talks about the hell being murky. " One; two: why, then 'tis time to do 't. Hell is murky! From Lady Macbeth's language in the sleep walking scene, we learn that her state of mind is deteriorating and she can't cope with the guilt. Lady Macbeth tends to use childlike language. " The Thane of Fife had a wife: where is she now?" She uses simple rhyme, fife and wife, to show that she blames herself for beginning the chain of the murders. She reverts to childhood using simply rhyme to show innocence. The Thane of Fife is Macduff's wife; we know that they have children because when Malcolm is telling Macduff of the murder of his family in Act IIII scene III, Macduff says "All my pretty ones?" She changes subject extremely quickly an example of this is "What, will these hands ever be clean? ...read more.

Conclusion

"Wash your hands put on your night-gown on; look not so pale. Lady Macbeth tends to talk about the murder scene and then onto the banquet "I tell you yet again, Banquo's buried; he cannot come out one's grave." This point is when she is reassuring Macbeth that murdered Banquo is only an elusion. Before this incident, Macbeth didn't want Lady Macbeth to know about Banquo's murder "Be innocent of the knowledge dearest chuck, Till thou applaud the deed." Macbeth didn't want Lady Macbeth to know because he did want her to worry about it and have trouble handling the guilt. I think Lady Macbeth thinks Macbeth is visualising the ghost of the king so she acts really quickly so their secret of the murder doesn't get out. Lady Macbeth is telling (in her dream/nightmare) that what you have done cannot be fixed you must live with the consequences. To bed, to bed: there's knocking at the gate. Come, come, come, come give me your hand. What's done cannot be undone. To bed, to bed, to bed. Oliver Wright 7236 Cranbourne School Basingstoke 24/02/2002 58421 ...read more.

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