• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Macbeth, Unnatural Deeds & Unnatural Troubles.

Extracts from this document...


The forces of "unnatural" are present throughout the play. Even from the setting and content of the first scene, the audience can see and sense the supernatural theme that will prevail throughout the play. In Macbeth I think that the witches are one of the main unnatural troubles. This is indicated from the very first scene where the witches are alone in "a desolate place". This gives a feeling of empty, barren, isolation and abandonment. This could be a ploy used by Shakespeare to describe old women of that era who were often accused of being witches. If they were accused, they would be outcast or even exiled from society. ...read more.


In this speech Shakespeare tries to use sibilant words to make Lady Macbeth sound more sinister and evil. For example, when she says "sightless substances". I think that he also uses oxymorons to surprise the audience, because in each example used in the oxymoron he goes to the extreme opposite of the other. "Come to my woman's breasts and take my milk for gall" is an example of this because her milk would be to help a baby live but instead she wants to be filled with poison, so if she did feed her baby, it would die. The sub-text seems to be an oxymoron as well because a Baby is the beginning of life but a poison is usually used to end a life. ...read more.


Mainly because horses are not usually renowned for hurting each other. And horses don't eat meat so it is unnatural for them to even eat anything, which was once a living animal. In Macbeth, the unnatural deeds are described differently from the general speech of the book. Shakespeare seems to use Oxymorons, Metaphors or other Descriptive methods to describe them. Shakespeare uses phantasmagorial images to show how Macbeth progresses to get more and more evil but he also gets more and more mentally unstable. He shows this by only, only letting Macbeth see a 'Dagger' in his first hallucination, but he then lets Macbeth see Banquo's ghost. It is obvious to me by Macbeth's reaction, that he is scared and shows anger to hide it. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Macbeth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Macbeth essays

  1. Macbeth committed many evil deeds in the play.

    'Stop up th' access and passage to remorse, That no compuctious visitings of Nature.' At the banquet, Lady Macbeth presents herself as a hostess. She acts like a woman with a warm heart and charm. This makes the murder a much more horrible crime; and more of a shock to the audience.

  2. MacBeth - Oxymoron.

    Act 2 Scene 1 Page 296 Line 41-42: "Is this a dagger which I see before me, / The handle toward my hand? At this point in time Macbeth thinks he sees a dagger floating in the air and its pointing to Duncan's room.

  1. Explore the concepts of natural and unnatural in Shakespeare(TM)s Macbeth

    these quotes are both illustrating the concept of appearance and reality, opposites are played against each other here, as something can look so Fair but can actually be foul. Pathetic fallacy is used whenever the witches are around as thunder and lightening, it is also used to give the impression

  2. An exploration of evil and its development within the Macbeth play 'Unnatural deeds do ...

    he was also affectionate of people who penchant him and said pleasant things about him. James himself wrote a book on witchcraft and had fancied himself an expert, it is also claimed he persecuted witches and had them hung. So Shakespeare wrote the play on honour of James.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work