• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Making closereference to the text, what questions and conflicts are introduced at the start of the play and what effect do they have on your audience?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Making close reference to the text, what questions and conflicts are introduced at the start of the play and what effect do they have on your audience? Othello is introduced mid conversation, during a quarrel between Roderigo and Iago, this immediately captures the attention of the audience because they already seem one step behind; therefore, they are already trying to catch up at the start. The immediate use of blaspheme from Iago, would have had a great affect, which would have got the seriousness of the quarrel across to the audience almost instantaneously. Roderigo's use of the word hate introduces more conflict into the play which includes somebody else not just Iago and Roderigo. Iago's long speech then puts the audience in the picture of exactly what is happening. ...read more.

Middle

This creates a very intriguing character but also creates the introducing conflict in the play, through Iago discussing this issue with Roderigo; the audience is also informed of the situation and can create their judgements. Roderigo gives his opinion of just what he would do if he were in Iago's position, "I would not follow him then." But Iago undermines it in a way that suggests Roderigo would be happy with being second best, "O, Sir, content you:" Iago follows with his speech informing the audience that he shall carry on in service because it is his duty to appear a servant and to fulfil his duty, but also slips in hints that he will only serve Othello for his own ends. " And, throwing but shows of service on their lords," Until line 41, signs of conflict appear only from Iago, regarding his job; mentions of battle are also evident which could be reflected later on in the play. ...read more.

Conclusion

Giving the idea that he makes himself clearly open to hurt but this is not his real character nor is it his real intent, but places the great question of what is Iago? It is clear from the opening of the play that Iago has a clear talent with language and he can make Roderigo hear just what he wants to hear, Roderigo himself is aware of this, "That thou, Iago, who hast my purse As if the strings were thine..." Iago sets a great platform for following conflicts to arise and questions of his character to be answered. We as an audience now have many questions in our minds, which keep us captured to find the answers. Immediately we want the question answered of just what Iago and Roderigo are arguing about? Is the Moor an unfair person to work for? And what is the real Iago and what are his plans? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Othello essays

  1. How was Othello(TM)s and Desdemona(TM)s relationship doomed from the start?

    This is shown through its democratic and justice system, where everyone has the right to express their opinions despite their colour or sex. The fact that Othello is a General in the Venetian Army and of great value to Venetian Government proves this.

  2. Othello - Critical Study of Text.

    Iago describes women as "Players in your housewifery, and housewives in your beds" (2, 1, 110-111). He also uses strong imagery with animals, and so do the other men, including Othello. The women in the play do try to bring about some power and independence for themselves.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work