• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Man is not truly one but two" (Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case) - With a close focus on the final section of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde examine how R.L. Stevenson explores the question of the duality in human nature in the novel.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Katie Wood Year 11 "Man is not truly one but two" (Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. With a close focus on the final section of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde examine how R.L. Stevenson explores the question of the duality in human nature in the novel. The key term in the title is the duality of human nature, this phrase is relating to the double sidedness of mans' nature such as the potential for good and evil. The character Henry Jekyll is personification of good versus evil because when he is Henry Jekyll he shows the good respected doctor in society but when he changes into Hyde - his alternative self - he becomes evil and sadistic. This means that it is good Jekyll versus evil Hyde. We see R.L. Stevenson refer to "dual nature" many times throughout Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case e.g. "Though so profound a double-dealer, I was in no sense a hypocrite; both sides of me were dead...". ...read more.

Middle

it seemed natural and human... it seemed more express and single, than the imperfect and divided countenance I had been hitherto accustomed to call mine... Edward Hyde... was pure evil". Jekyll then goes on to clearly explain the experience of his transformation into Edward Hyde. Jekyll describes to the reader the process of his transformation very clearly, and very in detail, he uses horrific imagery such as "a grinding in the bones, a deadly nausea" to describe the early painful stages of his transformation into Hyde. This imagery could link with Hyde's characteristics of an evil sadist. Jekyll then goes onto describe the secondary feelings of happiness, he explains how the appearance of Edward Hyde is everything he wished he looked like when he was Henry Jekyll, he uses light happy words to describe these e.g. "I felt younger, lighter and happier in body". When Hyde looks into the mirror he comments on the differences between himself and Jekyll. ...read more.

Conclusion

his hands are described as being "corded and hairy". Due to this, Hyde could be seen as the original, true nature of man, which has been repressed, but not destroyed. The reader also sees how Hyde's actions show an amoral lack of constraint e.g. the trampling of the child, killing of Carew. Hyde's actions suggest links with the primates' actions; this would not be how we expect a human to act however these are characteristics of an early ancestor such as an ape. Stevenson's idea of self-divide prefigures Sigmund Freud's notion of the human personality. Freud's theory was that the human mind had both a conscious and unconscious side to it. The mental devices of repression and resistance controlled both these. Repression is an unconscious method that made the memory of painful or threatening events unreachable by the conscious mind. Resistance is the unconscious defence against the awareness of repressed memories to avoid the resulting anguish. Jekyll can be linked to Freud's theory, because he repressed his evil self (Hyde), until he found out how he could unleash it, and after he did unleash Hyde, he regretted his actions. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson essays

  1. How does Robert Louis Stevenson explore the duality of human nature in Dr Jekyll ...

    that were prominent in Victorian times and at the time of the novella's publication are echoed through 'Jekyll and Hyde'. Jekyll who's always seen to be a respectable man, and always dressed in clothes which fit unlike Hyde's, representing Hyde's physical features as much smaller than Jekyll's.

  2. Jekyll and Hyde Essay; How does R. L. Stevenson convey the dual nature of ...

    Jekyll, Stevenson shows that Jekyll would want to be himself as he says, 'Even as good shone upon the countenance of the one, evil was written broadly and plainly on the face of the other.' This quote shows the reason for why Jekyll wanted to make that potion as, when

  1. Analyse how R.L Stevenson explores the issue of the Duality of Human Nature in ...

    Meaning that complex creatures evolve from more sophisticated ancestors naturally over time. Basically, as random genetic mutations occur with an organism's genetic code, the beneficial mutations are preserved because they aid survival, a process known as "natural selection". Over time, beneficial mutations accumulate and the result is an entirely different organism.

  2. How does R. L. Stevenson create horror and suspense in the novel 'Dr Jekyll ...

    This is peculiar behaviour and the reader has maximum sympathy for the young girl. In addition, Hyde is not at all disturbed by the incident of 'calmly' hurting her. When he witnesses the incident, Mr Enfield, an unemotional man has a strong reaction about it, 'sawbones turned sick and white with the desire to kill him.'

  1. Man is not truly two, but truly one

    Jekyll knows that Hyde's adventures are dangerous to the community, yet Jekyll still selfishly allows himself to enjoy the disguise of Hyde. The fact that Jekyll is not perfect, but really a mixture of good and evil, questions the possibility of separating these two poles.

  2. "Man is not truly one, but truly two" - A discussion on how this ...

    I think he meant that he was sick and tired of Jekyll's ideas and actions - and preferred the 'wholly evil' Hyde. I get this impression because previous to this reference, Stevenson describes Jekyll's shock and attraction to Hyde's appearance, which contrasts so clearly with his reaction to the look of Jekyll.

  1. How does Stevenson explore the theme of duality in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde?

    Soho London is where Mr hyde lived, at the time this area of London was where many prostitutes resided, where music halls and theatres were, the place where Jack the ripper roamed the streets and Brothels filled them. All in all it was similar to the street to where the back door of Jekyll's house was.

  2. Man is not truly one, but truly two. Show how Stevenson explores this idea ...

    Utterson got very disturbed by this testament especially having heard about Mr. Hyde from his cousin, Mr. Enfield. The story stated Mr. Hyde had chased and trampled over a small innocent girl; Mr. Enfield described the scene as a sight ?hellish to see.? This will that Mr.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work