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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

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Frankenstein 'Frankenstein' is a popular classic novel, read by many people, and written by a young woman named Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley. The novel came about being written because Shelley and a friend were taking part in a competition to see who could tell the best ghost story. Mary won this competition, and it even became a best seller with readers who are still fascinated by the storyline today. Shelley was born on August 30th, 1797, in London. Shelley's mother tragically died whilst giving birth to her. Percy and Shelley had met as a teenager and fell in love; he later edited her copy of 'Frankenstein'. It was published on January 1st, 1818 and immediately became a bestseller. Sadly, three of Shelley's four children died in infancy, then her husband drowned. She then became seriously ill and died in London, February 1851. There are six main characters included in this novel, first of all, Victor Frankenstein, the main character in the novel throughout. He is a Swiss man who attended University, there he learnt about science and was fascinated by the creation of human life, leading to the birth of the creature. The creature himself is also a main character, assembled from dead body parts and chemicals, stands 8 foot tall, and is very ugly, therefore doesn't fit in with society as they cannot understand him, he then turns evil and starts to murder people close to Frankenstein. Elizabeth Lavenza is Frankenstein's girlfriend who then becomes his wife, but tragically gets murdered by the creature on their wedding night. Robert Walton is the main narrator to Frankenstein's story who picked up Frankenstein from his chase after the creature. ...read more.


The grin was taken by Frankenstein as an evil grin, signifying that the monster did not like Frankenstein, but in reality, the creature was just trying to be friendly. However, Frankenstein was disgusted with his creation, and decided to leave the apartment, not to return, therefore the creature was abandoned and lonely, also he wouldn't have known what to do seeing as he could not understand the world, and they could equally not understand his hideous looks, therefore making the reader feel sorry for the monster as he hasn't done anything, "I did not dare return to the apartment which I inhabited", this also shows he is scared to return. The perception created by Shelley of the monster, is one that he cannot possibly be friendly because of how ugly he is, therefore people shout abuse and refuse to talk to him in a civilized way without mocking him or commenting on how ugly he looks. Other people may be scared of him, so try to run away when he gets close, this will make him feel angry with all the people who judge him by first impressions, without taking the courtesy to get to know him. He could of easily been a good man but society cast him out so he rapidly became the opposite, which makes us feel sorry for him as he cannot help being ugly and never gets a chance to show his nice personality, such as saving children from drowning. He is a victim of Frankenstein's ambitions and then abandonment, as Frankenstein was very eager, almost too eager, to create him, but after he saw what he had made, quickly despised him, left him alone, with no easy way of living, thus upsetting the creature because he never did anything wrong, just wanted to be loved. ...read more.


Also, earlier in the novel, the creature had killed his younger brother and his best friend to get back at him, which truly devastated Frankenstein, also a very horrific type of payback. Frankenstein could be perceived as a hero of modern day science because he went to extraordinary lengths and research to create human life, using science, which no one else before him had ever successfully done. He was also portrayed as a villain for playing with nature and God because people should take life how it is and not try to create more complex designs that God did not want to happen. However I do not believe that Frankenstein was a victim of the time he lived in because he simply shout not have created life without considering the drastic consequences that would happen. I think the perspective of this novel is that Shelley had lost the three of her four children and also her mother, during labour, possibly reflecting as a feeling of abandonment and loss due to death, she can therefore relate to the creature and Frankenstein because his close family and friends were murdered. I have sympathy for the creature more than Frankenstein because he was abandoned when he was first 'born', this was unfair because he hadn't done anything wrong and could not help the way he looked. Frankenstein should not have created him if he had thought properly about what he was doing; he had acted selfish for leaving the monster behind and abandoning him. Also, Frankenstein gets the creature's hopes up by saying he will create a companion for him, but then destroys his dream, which upsets the monster greatly. He has no friends, family etc. and this is not fair on him. ...read more.

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