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Media Coursework

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Introduction

English Media Coursework Analysis of a charity appeal In deconstructing the "World Wide Fund For Nature" leaflet, I will be focusing on the persuasive effects of language and the images used to influence readers to support the charity which cares for species of animals facing extinction, in particular, the orang-utans. The leaflet starts off with emboldened text which straightaway grabs the reader's attention. The first word of the opening statement is "Adopt", which is an imperative (a command). This is emotive because usually the word is associated with unwanted, uncared for children or orphans. This immediately evokes the reader's sympathy. Therefore, it makes the readers feel responsible for neglecting a vulnerable creature if they choose not to donate. Further along, the word "endangered" is used. This shocks the reader into thinking that there is a real fear that the animals are being harmed and that the world is not doing anything to protect these animals. Next, the writer uses the words "just three pounds". This makes the contribution sound affordable and reasonable. It is a clever use of minimisation and it makes the reader feel that he can actually do something about the animals' suffering, with just a small donation. Lastly, the opening statement ends with "protect a species", which makes the reader believe that he is doing an even greater deed than he thought because now he knows that this charity appeal doesn't only involve one animal, it refers to the whole species. ...read more.

Middle

This logo is very effective because its black and white colours stand out against the yellow background of the envelope. It contains a panda, which is one of the most endangered animals in the world. "For a living planet" is the slogan that follows. It is really effective because it suggests that planet earth would be lifeless without these precious animals. The emboldened, golden and emotional strapline sustains the reader's interest. "Could be extinct" is used once again, which is a repetition. The word 'extinct' suggests once again that we might never see these precious creatures again. Therefore it fills the audience with fear. This is hyperbole (deliberate exaggeration), which is used to compel the audience to donate. It is followed by "within 30 years". This alarms the readers because now they know how soon this species could be wiped out. In addition, the makers used the number '30' to show it is factual. The word "could" brings hope because it means there's still a chance that you can save them. Overall, this strapline is filled with emotive language to make readers feel empathy for these creatures. Beneath the strapline is the copy, which has been printed in a smaller font. This part of the leaflet is designed to give the reader a bit more information about the orang-utans. The makers of this appeal started the first paragraph by stating 'after millions of years'. ...read more.

Conclusion

This provides a poignant contrast and allows the makers to graphically illustrate the fact that if the readers do not protect the species in the first image the species will face consequences similar to those shown in the second image. The last words are 'Can the survivors rely on you?' This is also in a bold and golden font which signifies its importance. This is a rhetorical question and it makes the readers think that the animals are directly speaking to them and came to them for help, believing that they certainly will give a helping hand. The word "you" is a direct appeal to the reader and this personal pronoun makes the reader more involved in the cause and makes the appeal harder to ignore. The leaflet ends by saying that it was recycled. By this, it will make the readers think the makers are also humans who are doing everything to help the animals. In addition, it is in really fine small font which is tightly fitted at the bottom of the page, which suggests they are also trying to save paper and therefore save trees. Overall, I believe this is a very effective charity appeal because of the large amount of persuasive techniques used such as emotive language, repetition, minimisation and facts and opinions. Combined, these techniques ensure that readers feel sympathy for the animals' plight and therefore feel more compelled to help. ?? ?? ?? ?? English Media Coursework by Sifat Ahmed 9444 2009 1 Ms Christian ...read more.

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