• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Men and Women - Short Stories from the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Men and Women -Short Stories from the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries In Thomas Hardy's- Tony Kytes, the Arch deceiver, he amuses the reader by allowing Tony Kytes to embarrass himself he does this by telling his three so-called girlfriends on his horse and carriage, to hide in the back of the carriage without the, knowing the others are there. In one instance Thomas Hardy writes: 'Dearest Unity will ye, to avoid all the unpleasantness which I know ye can't bear any more than I, will ye lie in the back part of the waggon and let me cover you over with the tarpaulin till Milly has passed? Do! - And I'll think over what we've said and perhaps I shall put a loving question to you after all instead of Milly' The quote shows how cunning Tony Kytes thinks he is. In this case he barters Unity by saying he will consider loving her for saving his own skin. The deviousness of Tony Kytes is, in short very humorous and amusing. In the story we know that he has many lovers and because of this we know that the story is obviously going to end badly for him. The fact that he is trying to get away with loving three women is itself amusing. Thomas Hardy builds up the humorous suspense by having each lady hidden sequentially supposedly without any of them knowing the other one is there. ...read more.

Middle

Maggie worked that out and so Bill Naughton explains that she will not stand for being deceived. Maggie also says: 'But there's one thing that lets you down mister-you're too bloody smart!' With those words learning his lesson which was being smart can have a negative affect. We know this because Bill Naughton writes: 'On that four mile hoof back to town, along the cold wet streets, I was able to weigh up her words over and over again, and realise for the first time in my life, how being right smart can not only get you in- but can also get you flung out.' The similarities in the three stories about relationships between men and women is that all the relationships are about being deceived for example: In Thomas Hardy's- Tony Kytes, the Arch deceiver, Tony Kytes promises all the "girlfriends" that he will consider marrying them as an alternative to Milly Richards. Near the end Hannah a former girlfriend noticed there was a loud, angry, squeak coming from the back of the waggon. This occurred when she said 'Throw over Milly? -All to marry me! How delightful!' The loud, angry squeak was of course Milly Richards in the back of the waggon, Hannah and Unity both refuse Tony Kytes' appeal for marriage. So in the end he was left with Milly Richards to whom he married the very next week. ...read more.

Conclusion

I'd been waiting for the applause.' 'Steady up Maggie' I said'. As I stood up she stood up in front of me. She seemed to be in some kind of temper that put inches on her height and her bust. For the first time I was able to see signs of the Queen in her.' This paragraph continues to make you want to read on, find out what happens next, and makes you want to read on. 'You might have taken her in, but you're not taking me in!' This is a major part of the story although it is one line. It shows that Maggie is ending her relationship with 'Rudy' because she believes that he will deceive her. If I were writing a story on this theme set in the present day it would be different because I would put another man or woman in the story so either the man or the woman decides to cheat on their partner. This should create an environment for the reader so they want to read on. The cheating partner would try and deceive the other and the other partner finds out. At this point I would leave the reader in suspense and let the tension rise. Then I would release all the tension at once. This would shock the reader and end the story in a sad way for example 'You've caused enough grief to last me an entire lifetime I will leave you in peace forever' (and the person would walk away) BENITO SEGARAJASINGHE ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Thomas Hardy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Thomas Hardy essays

  1. Comparison of "Tony Kytes, the arch deceiver" by Thomas Hardy and "Tickets please" by ...

    Lawrence is writing in the present tense); buzzing modern cities, motorways and an array of people, not the way the Lawrence's intended reader is to imagine. This is because although the story was set in the past, it was set in the immediate past for the reader of that time,

  2. Essay with reference to the following Thomas Hardy short stories "Tony Kytes: Arch Deceiver", ...

    She relies "O, I never! That old man!" Which is just the language needed to show her disgust at the prospect of marrying Lovill and deserting Oswald. She does not want to disappoint her uncle though, so agrees that she will marry Lovill if Oswald doesn't return by November.

  1. Discuss the way in which the authors present women in the four short stories.

    Chopin decided to make Dorethea a very superficial character. She is supposed to feel very passionately for her other half but as soon as he loses his looks due to serious illness she can't bear to be around him. "At the sight and the touch of him something within her seemed to be shuddering" If Dorethea's love for Randall

  2. Which of the women in the pre nineteen-hundreds short stories set for study are ...

    Hannah says some things that are quite uncommon for a lady of that period, for example, Hannah says 'well aren't you going to be civil enough to ask me to ride home with you?' this is unusual because she isn't waiting to be invited for a ride she is asking.

  1. With close reference to 5 Thomas Hardy short stories, compare his descriptions of the ...

    What can I do else? Surely you don't want me to walk, now I've come all this way?' she is a little angry with him because she believes he should have picked her up earlier; Tony in response makes up an excuse that doesn't really make much sense.

  2. Compare the relationships between men and women in 'Tony Kytes, the Arch-Deceiver' by Thomas ...

    However in 'Tickets Please' the parents don't feature at all. The relationships in 'Tickets Please' are very different from those in 'Tony Kytes'. The men and women in 'Tickets Please' have very casual, physical relationships. They are looking to have fun not marriage.

  1. 'How did authors show that women were treated differently in the Nineteenth Century?'

    This fact gives the hint that women agreed with the society at the time and felt they need a man to protect/look after them as they were too incapable and therefore inferior themselves. The story concludes with Tony marrying Milly who is the most pathetic and dependent out of all the women.

  2. Compare the treatment of males and females in the two stories; Tony Kytes the ...

    He has his idea that his mother is lonely, solitude to her own. He would expect her to only look to him in time of need. Philip is self-centred but not selfish. He listens to reason when Mr Nixon when he explains to him that he has asked his mother to marry him and she has agreed.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work