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Modern Poetry Comparison

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Introduction

Modern Poetry Comparison Over the past few weeks, my class and I have been studying a bank of poems, all of the same theme, they all deal with racist issues in modern life. I have chosen two of these poems to compare, these are, 'The Negro' and 'Prayer of a black boy'. Throughout the coursework I shall be calling 'Prayer of a black boy' Poem 'A', and 'The Negro', poem 'B'. Poem 'A' uses imagery contrasting white and black cultures, lots of words and expressions in the poem underlines the wonder and amazement of the Negro's natural environment, and the barrenness and unproficness of the white man's. I will be disusing these and pointing out the affects they have. Poem 'B' is in 6 clear stanzas but uses imagery of a symbolic and/or historic kind, and so I will also explain the affects this has upon the poem, and although Poem 'A' is written continuously, it can easily be broken into six stanzas for comparison. Also both poems are written in the first person, we know this because they say 'I'. ...read more.

Middle

But he seems to be proud of what he and his race have done to get where they are now. During the second part of Poem 'B', the man describes a beautiful scene of where and what he wants to be, but then he thinks about what will really happen, which is that his people are slaves and workers all day then he says they are spat out of the factory in which they work. He also dreams of going back to his own country and living freely amongst his people, but he then awakes with great disappointment to se he is still stuck in a white mans world. In the third part of Poem 'A' the man explains that he worked on ancient buildings as well as very modern buildings, which shows us a sense of time, of which he and his people have been treated with a lower standard from the white people, and over a long period of time. The man in Poem 'B' tells us that what the so called gentleman is, he doesn't want to be, because he can see the real white people and they are not kind and generous as a real gentleman is thought to be. ...read more.

Conclusion

They have been treated unfairly and with no trial they are punished. Poem 'B' section five, tells us that the man doesn't want to learn the ways and religion of the white people, he wants to know his own history and practise his own religion, the religion of the black people from his home country. He asks why he should read about things he doesn't know or understand of. The white people's religion comes from a book, (the bible), whereas black religion is carried through time in stories and songs. The final section of Poem 'A' is the exact same as the first stanza, he repeats how proud he is of where how hard him and his race have worked, and that he is proud of his wonderful country, his wonderful home, Africa. The final section of Poem 'B' isn't the same as it's first, in this final part, the black man explains that white people are too sad for his kind, and that his culture are in touch with there countries natural habitat and that the white people are far too industrious. The final line tells us that the white culture needs to lighten up a bit. ...read more.

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