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Monster/Vampire movies are concerned with sexual transgression,

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Introduction

Monster/Vampire movies are concerned with sexual transgression, psychological transformation, and moral retribution. Discuss this statement, using examples where you can. Vampires, not only lurking in far away lands such as the renowned Transylvania, but also have been said to lie in the deepest recesses of the human psyche. Its home, not a fortified castle guarded by the children of the night, but the realm of the sub-text, guarded by endless narratives. Each, a new bread in themselves, having represented different arenas in the human social order one thing remains true in all the Vampire narratives, they always have something to do with the idea of a being, or way of being, that literally lives off another. What follows, are accounts by various authors on the subject of the vampire myth and ledged, its place in society and in psyche of its people. However, it must be noted that although the realm of the vampire is huge and many have existed, there is none other than Dracula that more writings have been engaged in for which this essay will pay close attention to. Dracula, Sex & Taboo "The vampire idea deals in the terror of recognising, challenging or being challenged by dependency, and always registers this through the body: the dependencies of its needs and drives, especially, but not exclusively, sexuality." ...read more.

Middle

It has already been discussed that perhaps in some narratives the true horror is woman's sexual independence, but an interesting case to study is Shadow of the Vampire (E. Elias Merhige; US, 2000). This film questions the integrity of Max Shreck, the actor who played Nosferatu in Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauensby (F.W. Murnau; Germany, 1922), and asks if the actor was indeed a vampire himself. But Shadow of the Vampire presents the audience with not one, but two villains, and indeed dabbles with the possibility (as do most vampire films) that the Vampire is not inherently evil. In this film, the director, F.W. Murnau is perhaps the true villain; so desperate is he to make his art that he is willing to barter with people's lives. This is juxtaposed with Max Shreck telling the producer of the film that, "It was a woman that did this too me!" He loved her so much, and then she left. His intense desire for woman made him this way. Perhaps, as a vampire, the integrity of love is questioned which goes against the traditional Christian and social goal. "The central sacrament of Christianity is wine drunk as blood (in the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation, this is at the spiritual level no mere symbol, it is the actual blood of Christ); the most important icon of Christianity is a dead man who has eternal life." ...read more.

Conclusion

This makes her strong, and she is idolised among the female community for her strength as she transcends the boundaries put before her by her Californian culture. However as an interesting side note, it could also be argued that had the vampires not been there, she would remain in the maxim 'I shop, therefore I am', and therefore this free spirited fighter and defender of woman is defined only when juxtaposed against the vampire himself. Conclusion What Buffy manages to do is keep the threat of the vampire and indeed all other threats possible to society alive, after all the vampire is ever living. In Blade (Stephen Norrington; US, 1998), there are possible parallels drawn between the HIV virus and vampirism. The over use of science in the field of blood sucking, and the term 'virus' in the Blade 2 (Guillermo del Toro; US, 2002) suggest a narrative concerned with current contemporary issues surrounding blood. The same happens in Buffy although the issues never seem to be engaged in any true depth but certainly are mentioned. When looking at vampire narratives of the last century, other contemporary issues are again touched. Whether it be the treat of industrialisation, anti-imperialist societies and the loss of nation identity or the rise of the woman in both society and their sexuality, the vampire it seems will always remain ever-living, for until we completely stop being threatened, our fear will always be drained by the jaws of a blood sucker. ...read more.

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