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Most of the characters in 'Of Mice and Men' are social misfits in one sense or another. Discuss the consequences of their social inadequacies.

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Introduction

Most of the characters in 'Of Mice and Men' are social misfits in one sense or another. Discuss the consequences of their social inadequacies. Most of the characters in 'Of Mice and Men' are social misfits. Some of them have consequences because of their social inadequacies. Some of the characters are outcasts because of their appearances rather than their nature or personalities. A classic example of this is crooks. Crooks is a man of a black race and he is discriminated by the other men on the ranch because of this. On the ranch race is an important factor among the workers. All the other workers on the ranch are white but crooks is black. This important fact is one of his social inadequacies. Some of the workers believe that if you white you have more power and status than if you are black. Because of his race he is not called by his name but by the name 'nigger'. ...read more.

Middle

Maybe he thinks it would make things easier for him if he just gives up rather than struggling for something that he knows he is not going to win. In all C rooks is basically a victim of his own race and disability. Another reason for some characters being considered as social misfits is because of their personality or nature. Curley's wife shows us an example of this. Curley's wife is the only female on the ranch therefore she is left out and judged a lot. She is judged a lot because the men don't spend time with omen except when they go down to Suzie's place and because the only women they know are the ones at Suzie's place they think that all women are like that. Even though she is only a 15 year old girl she tries to put on an act to be an older woman and because of this she is considered to be naive. ...read more.

Conclusion

H e has not got a very stable mind and is a bit slow in the sense that he is not mentally stable. This is his downfall because it means that he does not have the mind to think for himself so instead he follows George's orders. He has a certain 'pattern of behaviour'. This pattern of behaviour happens every time he panics. It starts off with him with him petting something soft, then the person or animal verbally or physically bites him back, so the over reacts and causes the animal or person more pain and eventually kills them. After that he panics at the fear of what George might do to him if he finds out he then goes into denial and blames the incident on the person or animal. This is called his 'pantomime of innocence'. As a result of this inadequacy he is brought to a terrifying and horrible death by George because of the terrible thing he has done. There are three characters that show us classic examples of social misfits and the consequences of their inadequacies. By Sharlynne Wilson 10x/10pt ...read more.

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