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Much Ado About Nothing

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Introduction

Much Ado About Nothing In Act 1, scene 1 we are introduced to Claudio, a 'young Florentine and powerful soldier: doing in the figure of a lamb the feats of a lion.' What this metaphore means is he looks young, sweet and innosent but can actually fight with power and valour. Claudio has become very well-known for his acts, but not by looks - Don Pedro (a very succesful commander); 'hath bestowe4d much honour on a young Florentine.' When Claudio reaches Messina with his comrades he sees the daughter or Leonato: Hero. He instantly falls in love with her: 'In mine eye, she is the sweetest lady that ever I looked on.' Because he says this we know that he has in fact fallen in love with Hero's looks and her looks only... ...read more.

Middle

Don John sets out to find Claudio. Once he finds him, Claudio is led to believe something and does: "Tis certain so; the Prince woos for himself..." This proves Claudio to be gullable from two things - he believed a known mischeif maker (Don Johon), also because he mistrusted the honourable prince who had been his leader in battle beforehand. Claudio is not just a fool once in the play, though; later on in the play 'he falls victim to another, of Don John's tricks: Don't John gets his associate' Borchio to appear with Hero's main: Margerate, in Hero's room. Then Don John finds Claudio and shows him and tells him: "the lady is disloyal... your Hero... go but with me tonight. ...read more.

Conclusion

We also know she is young as well from the fact her father is the governer of Messina still. She resembles Claudio in many ways: She is shy, does not speak much, and young. Also in the Ken Branagh film Hero is beautiful, Claudio is also supposed to have good looks - "... In the figure of a lamb." People associate lambs with looks sweet and inosent also. Claudio and Hero do not know each other wel; they are engaged purly on looks, Claudio had seen Hero before in the 'Battle he was in, but only breafly:' "I looked upon her with a soldiers eye." This statement implies he wanted to get to know her better before he went to war... but could not due to the fact he had to fight. ...read more.

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