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Much Ado About Nothing Essay

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In Act 3, Scene 2, of the play "Much Ado about Nothing" a revelation is revealed; this is that Hero is not a virgin. Hero is to be married to Claudio, but is this true love? "Much Ado about Nothing" was written at the end of the 16th century. Elizabethan England was a strictly patriarchal society at the time, and the view of women was that they were supposed to be silent and passive to the will of men. A women's traditional roll in life was to bear children and generally be a good housewife, it was also a fathers place to marry his daughter off to a rich gentleman, which Hero's father Leonarto was doing. In these times, marriage equalled a business transaction and it would not matter if the daughter did not like whom she was to be married to. Although, we believe that this is not the case with Claudio and Hero. At the beginning of the play when Prince Don Pedro returns back from the war with ????? Claudio is love-struck by Hero's beauty and asks Benedick his opinion of her. Benedick, a sworn bachelor, is shocked at Claudio's words and tells him that he does not think Hero is that beautiful. Claudio values his opinion, but also wants to marry Hero. ...read more.


previously said because they knew what they saw and that was 'Hero with another gentleman' Don Pedro tells Leonarto "I am sorry you must hear: upon mine honour, Myself, My brother, and this grieved Count Did See her, hear her, at that hour last night, talk with a ruffian at her chamber window, who hath indeed most like a liberal villain, Confessed the vile encounters they have had a thousand times in secret." This means that Don Pedro is saying what Claudio said was true and himself, his brother and Claudio, heard and saw it all at her bedroom window. Leonarto did not like what he had heard and because of the society that they lived in, he believed Claudio, Don Pedro and Don John over his own daughter. Leonarto cried out for a dagger to which he wanted to commit suicide because of what his daughter has done. Shame and disgrace had been brought on him at what she had allegedly done. On these words Hero fell to the ground and Beatrice and Benedick believed that she is dead. She was not actually dead but, had fainted from the shock of what her father has said. Help was asked for, but Leonarto answers with "oh fate! Take not away thy heavy hand, Death is the fairest cover for her shame" These words show Leonarto's feelings towards what Hero had supposedly done, and a man's position was believed above a women's, whether it be family or not. ...read more.


Benedick is also upset by the accusations and believes Hero, but further believes that the problems lie with Don John. "Two of them have the very bent of honour, and if their wisdoms be misled in this, the practice of it lives in John the bastard, whose spirits toil in frames of villainies." In other words, these are two good people, but they can easily be misled, and the person who could easily mislead them may perhaps be John the bastard. When all the guests have gone, only Beatrice and Benedick are left in the Church. Beatrice is upset, and this is because of what has happened to Hero. He asks if there is any way he can show his friend ship towards her. Instead he ends up confesses his love for her, and she equally confesses her affection toward Benedick. Problems occur when Benedick says he will do anything for Beatrice but the one thing she wants Benedick to do is "Kill Claudio" for all the hurt he has caused toward her cousin and herself. At first Benedick completely dismisses it, he is Claudio's friend, but he knows he has to show his true love for Beatrice, so that she knows that it is true, so he tells her he will do it. Yellow= Claudio's accusations and Don Pedro's Support Blue= Leonarto's response Red= Hero's response Green= Beatrice and Benedict's response to the accusations ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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