• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Much to do with hate, but more to do with love" Consider Shakespeare's presentation of the theme of Romeo and Juliet with particular reference to character, language, setting and context.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Much to do with hate, but more to do with love" Consider Shakespeare's presentation of the theme of Romeo and Juliet with particular reference to character, language, setting and context. Love. The play Romeo and Juliet is based around love but, what is it? People always say their in love but how do they know? So many philosophers have tried to explain the word love, but what is it really? So were Romeo and Juliet ever in love with anyone? How do they show it? If not, how could they not be in love in the city of romance, Verona? The country of lovers, Italy? These are questions I asked myself when I read the play, watched the video and before I began this essay. So what is Love? The dictionary says Love is "A deep, tender, ineffable feeling of affection and solicitude toward a person, such as that arising from kinship, recognition of attractive qualities, or a sense of underlying oneness." ...read more.

Middle

But Shakespeare makes a joke of how upper class children do not have a close relationship with their parents. The fact that the nurse had to be with her is like a Lawyer and there client, a business like relationship. However the nurse is more like a friend than a carer, telling her to sleep with men and have fun 'Go, girl, seek happy nights to happy days.' But in front of Lady Capulet, the nurse becomes a carer again, talking about breast-feeding and caring for her 'thou hadst suck'd wisdom from thy teat'. Whereas Romeo's feelings for Juliet are never certain, at first he is in love with Rosalind, he believes that if someone says they see someone more beautiful than Rosalind then they should be burnt a the stake for lying 'Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars'. Romeos words are inspired by the practice of burning witches and heretics at the stake; this was common at the time of Shakespeare. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare also played with the language of the script, using the class difference of the audience to an advantage. This gave him an opportunity to make upper and lower class jokes as well as characters. The lower class characters, such as commoners or servants, speak in prose and use a lot of slang, to relate to the lower class audience. Using sexual jokes and un-rhyming verses, 'For Juliet's sake stand and rise.' Stand and rise is the nurse making a joke of Romeo because he should have had sex with her by now. The lower class would have loved this, a lower class character making a sex joke at an upper class character. Whereas the upper class characters speak in Blank-verse, using puns and soliloquies. This would have applied to upper class audience members who would understand these jokes more than the lower class. In general I felt that Romeo and Juliet had a moral to the story. The way that they both overcame their families hate for each other. The fact that they killed there selves shows there commitment and love for each other. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. "Here's much to do with hate, but more with love." Consider the two themes ...

    If it is her name that is coming between them, then she will give it up. When Romeo finally speaks, Juliet tells Romeo that if the 'kinsmen' find him, they will kill him. However, Romeo replies by saying, "For stony limits cannot hold love out, And what love can do, dares love attempt.

  2. Analyse the dramatic function of Mercutio in "Romeo and Juliet" with appropriate reference to ...

    Benvolio sticks up for Romeo although he, also, feels that Romeo needs to get over Rosaline. "Come, he hath hid himself among these trees, To be consorted with the humorous night: Blind is love and best befits the dark." The Queen Mab speech shows a different side of Mercutio.

  1. Here's much to do with hate, but more with love'

    In 'Romeo and Juliet' Romeo marries Juliet and therefore loves Tybalt as he is part of his family, Romeo also loves his friend Mercutio. But, when Romeo has to choose between family love and love for a friend Romeo chooses a friend, when Mercutio has been killed Romeo seeks revenge on Tybalt.

  2. Romeo says 'here's much to do with hate but more with love' - Romeo ...

    friends life and he fault the only way he could do it was to kill Tybalt. I think if Romeo had been cool then he would of realised that Tybalt would of been excuted for killing Mercutio but by Romeo killing Tybalt he has got himself into alot of trouble.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work