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of mice and men curley's wife

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To what extent is Curley's Wife a Victim? Of Mice and Men is a microism of 1930s American society. Following the 1929 Wall Street Crash,, America went into the Great Depression, which lead many Americans to realise that the American Dream was never really possible. We see Curley's Wife as a representation of women in America at that time. John Steinbeck's novella of Mice and Men set in rural California during the Great Depression centres the friendship of two itinerant ranch workers: George Milton and Lennie Small. On arrival at their new employment, George and Lennie meet Curley's Wife - the flirtatious; pretty; lonely young wife of the Boss' son, Curley. Many people would argue that yes Curley's Wife was a victim, for reasons being: she was forever lonely and unable to talk to other members of the ranch. "Why can't I talk to you? I never get to talk to nobody. I get awful lonely." This proves Curley's Wife is an outsider like Crooks who is lonely-she just wants somebody to talk to. This picks up the theme of loneliness in the 1930s American society; Curley's Wife is not happy living in her father-in-law's ranch. ...read more.


The curls, tiny sausages, were spread on the hay behind her head, and her kips were parted." This shows the readers that all along Curley's Wife was a natural beauty behind all the heavy make-up and redness. She has transformed into a beauty by death; she seems to have become an angel. Finally she has found what she has ultimately been looking for: peace and freedom away from her abusive husband and rash mother. However, aside from all this, many people would still see her as not a victim. This is because, she is always described as dressed in red. "Both men glanced up, for the rectangle of sunshine in the doorway was cut off. A girl was standing there looking in. she had full rouged lips and wide-spaced eyes, heavily made up. Her fingernails were red. Her hair hung in little rolled clusters, like sausages. She wore a cotton dress and red mules, on the insteps of which were little bouquets of red ostrich feathers." Curley's Wife is blocking the sunlight. This foreshadows her being involved in a crucial part of the novel. ...read more.


She wants Lennie to notice her because she knows he is too dumb to say anything to Curley about her talking to other men. Furthermore, many readers would argue she was playing with fire by going after Lennie as he is so strong and powerful and this is backed up when she ironically gets killed by Lennie. To conclude, Curley's Wife is seen by men as a strong, powerful woman who cannot be abused, however many would argue she was being sexually abused by Curley. At the same time, all the characters in Of Mice and Men are victims; they all have the big American Dream that never really takes place. In my opinion, Curley's Wife is both a victim and a culprit; this is because, towards the beginning of the novella, she is portrayed as a prostitute, danger to be around, however towards the end, we begin to see that all she has ever wanted is the big American Dream. As she is killed at the end, we again see how she is an innocent women longing for freedom and companionship from someone. ?? ?? ?? ?? - 1 - ...read more.

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