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Of Mice and Men. Explore the ways Steinbeck makes the ending of the novel so moving.

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Introduction

Explore the ways Steinbeck makes the ending of the novel so moving. Remember to support your ideas with details from the novel John Steinbeck makes the ending of Of Mice and Men moving in many ways. The way Steinbeck presents the relationship between George and Lennie is arguably the biggest factor that makes the end of the novel so moving. However, there are other factors such as the way the other characters react to Lennie's death and Steinbeck's description of the natural world. The relationship between George and Lennie is one of the main reasons as to why the ending of the novel is so moving. ...read more.

Middle

This is one way how Steinbeck makes the end of the novel so moving. The way Steinbeck describes the natural world also makes the end of the novel moving. Steinbeck uses the example of a water snake being eaten. When the snake is being eaten, it is described as waving its tail "frantically." This shows the reader that the snake is helpless and it has no way of escaping from its fate. This makes the ending of the novel moving because it makes the reader realise Lennie's fate and the fact that Lennie is now helpless. After the water snake does die, another snake immediately replaces the dead snake. ...read more.

Conclusion

He says, "Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin' them two guys?" This makes the novel moving as it shows the reader that Carlson does not care about the death of Lennie. The fact the Carlson ends the novel makes the reader wonder if George will become like Carlson without Lennie (i.e. a man with no feelings and a man "who goes mean."). This also makes the ending of the novel moving. In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck describes a variety of events which make the ending of the novel so moving. Just like many men in 1930s America, George and Lennie wasn't to achieve the American dream, only to have their dream completely ruined. This makes the reader feel sorry for the two characters and thus, in this way, the ending of the novel is moving. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay


The strength of this essay is that there is a strong structure to each paragraph. It begins with a point. There is a well-selected quote, and it is then linked back to the essay title. However, the weakness of the essay is that the link back to the title is very simplistic, and doesn't really explain how or why the point shows that the ending is moving.

Marked by teacher Melissa Thompson 26/03/2013

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