• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Of Mice and Men - The differences between the book and the film.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

By Ollie Wright This essay will tell you the differences between the film and the novel, with reasons. I have read the book and watched the film 'Of Mice and Men'. The novel starts with Lennie and George walking towards a ranch a few miles south of Soledad in America. Lennie is described as large man of simple intelligence: " He walked heavily, dragging his feet a little, the way a bear drags his paws." George, however, is just the opposite, clever and alert: "The first man was small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features." George promised to take care of Lennie when his Aunt Clara died. The film starts with a young woman in her twenties in a red dress that is ripped; she is crying. This gives the viewer the impression that she has been attacked and possibly raped. Lennie and George are hiding in a water-filled ditch. Weed ranch men on horseback, with guns, appear to be hunting them. The director of the film has started with this scene because it feels sinister and makes you want to know what happens to Lennie and George. In the book, there is a discussion between George and Lennie about the bus journey "Jes a little stretch down the road. ...read more.

Middle

Lennie was told off by George and sent to take it back to the barn. In the film we see Lennie pretending to bring in second pup. This makes Lennie much more intelligent compared to the novel where he doesn't seem bright enough to play such a trick. In both the film and the novel, Candy's faithful old dog is shot by Carlson, but Candy's emotions are portrayed completely differently. In the novel, Candy just looks at the ceiling and doesn't react to anything around him, "Only Candy continued to stare at the ceiling," but in the film we see and hear Candy crying openly. I believe Garry Sinise makes us empathetic towards Candy and this shows how George could feel if he lost Lennie as Candy's dog was his only friend. There were a number of additional scenes in the film, such as: the men at work, the incident at Weed and scenes that bring George closer to Curley's wife. Garry Sinise has done this to make Curley's wife less of a tart and makes us feel warmer towards her. The film has missed out the scene where Crooks, Lennie, Candy and Curley's wife are altogether in the barn and Curley's wife says that she could get Crooks hung by the click of her fingers. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the novel, the ranch hands find George standing over Lennie's body after shooting him. George has done this out of love for Lennie and made his departure painless as possible. As George is going to shoot him he tells Lennie their dream about owning their private ranch. He had to kill him first to stop the ranch men slaughtering him: "The hand shook violently, but his face set and his hand steadied." In the novel, when the ranch men find George they congratulate him on killing Lennie. This is missed out in the film, I believe that director did this so the ranch hands wouldn't appear unsympathetic towards the George. It could be that the director was trying to show that most people aren't consciously cruel, only ignorant. In the concluding scene, of the film, George is shown in a railway carriage remembering Lennie. This is effective because it makes you grieve with him, about Lennie's death. This scene doesn't appear in the book. After studying "Of Mice and Men", I found the ending was unexpected and it surprised me that George killed Lennie. Of the two versions, I preferred the film because of the visual impact and the music, which the novel could not portray. I feel this added tension and impact. Oliver Wright 7236 Cranbourne School Basingstoke 24/02/2002 58421 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE John Steinbeck section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE John Steinbeck essays

  1. Why I think Candy was added by John Steinbeck to his book

    Candy, in he novel tells us that he only has three hundred dollars in the bank this seems like a very little amount to have in the bank and it is that is all the capital he has raised since the start of the Great Depression John Steinbeck was born and raised in Salinas, in 1902.

  2. Compare Steinbeck's novel with the1992 film version of 'Of Mice and Men'. In your ...

    The Sycamore's horizontal limb has been worn away from people sitting on it so much. This has been told to the reader because it shows that this place has been encountered by man and is not hidden. Steinbeck sets the scene by giving vibrant colours to objects like the path in the first paragraph.

  1. I am going to compare 'of mice and men' chapter 1 of the novel ...

    George as the smart one tells him not to drink so much. Lennie was playing with the water like a little kid, as the author says, Lennie dabbled his big paws in the water and wiggled his fingers so the water arose in little splashes.

  2. How would you use film language to make the final scene of 'Of Mice ...

    For soundtracks/FX, we especially tried to imitate characters' moods and feelings. Finally, suitable dialogue in calculated manner and appropriate timing re-enforced our essence of Lennie's demise and George's position. The establishing shots arouse an audience's preliminary attention and directly convey a filmmaker's purposes.

  1. Saving Private Ryan

    keys and he watches a boat go on fire and men burning to death. He puts his helmet back on and his helmet has a mixture of blood and water in it, it all gushes down his face like a fast flowing waterfall.

  2. Having Read Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck the section of the book ...

    Later in the scene inside the great barn Curley's wife is sitting next to Lennie on the remaining wisps of hay and is talking to him. The camera is an over-shoulder shot - this is where we see what is happening as if we were looking over a character's shoulder.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work