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Of Mice and Men. The section between George followed to the door and shut the door until George shuffled the cards noisily and dealt them is a particularly tensed scene because the reader and the characters are waiting for a specific event

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Introduction

1. Re-read p. 49 from "George followed to the door and shut the door..." until "George shuffled the cards noisily and dealt them." on p. 50. How does Steinbeck create tension in this extract? Remember to use Point-Evidence-Explanation (referring to language techniques and effects), giving the reader's personal response. The section between "George followed to the door and shut the door..." until "George shuffled the cards noisily and dealt them" is a particularly tensed scene because the reader and the characters are waiting for a specific event to happen. Carlson has taken Candy's dog to shoot him. In the scene, everyone is waiting for the shot, which is the climax point of the tension, and the waiting makes the tension worse. The scene comes after we have viewed the argument of the men about Candy's dog. Candy doesn't want to kill his dog, so Carlson takes the dog outside to put it out of its misery. The reader might think that the men are being selfish, because they aren't thinking about Candy who loves his dog, but about themselves. ...read more.

Middle

There is another unsuccessful attempt for conversation, by George: "I bet Lennie's right out there in the barn with his pup." George mentioning Lennie's puppy reminds everyone that Candy's dog is about to get shot and increases tension. Slim tries to comfort Candy: "you can have any one of them pups you want." The reader here feels sorry for Candy and is wondering if another puppy can replace his dog. The personification later on highlights the tension in the bunk. "The silence...invaded the room." However, George interrupts it by suggesting "to play a little euchre." This shows that he's trying to keep the attention of the others focused somewhere else. "He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all the men in the room." We can see that George is nervous, because he is waiting for the shot and also for Candy's reaction. In addition, we can see that the men are aware of the sounds going on in the room. ...read more.

Conclusion

The men looked at Candy to see his reaction. "He rolled slowly over and faced the wall and lay silent." Candy's reaction suggests that he doesn't want to show his emotions to the others. The reader is now wondering what Candy's thoughts are and feels empathy for him, because all of this was out of his control. "George shuffled the cards noisily and dealt them." This suggests that after the shot everything is back to normal, the silence and tension left like they had come. The tension in this scene is achieved by the author in a variety of ways, from the choice of words to the description of the time passing. It engages the reader and makes them feel sorry for Candy and his dog, his only true companion. The reader has now a lot of questions: Where will this incidence lead? Will Candy get another puppy? Will something similar happen further on? Next time the victim might even be a human. ?? ?? ?? ?? Melissa Iacovidou - 3 Red - 1 - Words: 800 without quotations 1033 with quotations 14/05/2010 ...read more.

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