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Of this dead butcher and his fiend like queen. How far do you agree with this view of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth?

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Introduction

Page 75 line35: "of this dead butcher and his fiend like queen". How far do you agree with this view of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth? I do agree with the statement made by Malcolm describing his view of Macbeth and his wife; however, only at the time it was said. Therefore I will precisely describe the characteristics of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth to show that they are not just evil and that they do have some positive aspects. Nevertheless Macbeth and Lady Macbeth's demise were their own faults. At the start of the play the statement is incorrect as Macbeth is loyal to his king and he loves his wife very much. Macbeth is very courageous as he carves a passage through the first army to reach the enemy leader Macdonwald and decapitates him: "Till he unseamed him from the nave to the chaps," (1.2) showing his ferociousness and his loyalty to the king. Straight after that Macbeth shows his bravery by rushing off to fight the Norwegian army that has just landed. King Duncan shows his gratitude to Macbeth: "More is thy due than more than all can pay." (1.4). The witches are introduced in the dark, wet moors of Scotland muttering under their breath. He meets the witches the first time by chance and is astounded that they know of his secret that he wants to be king (even his closest friend does not know) ...read more.

Middle

Her ambition shows when she takes drastic measures to stop the truth revealing. It also shows love for her husband when he slips up: "That did kill them [the guards]," Lady Macbeth steps in and pretends to faint to stop the questioning of Macbeth. This tells us she can think quickly on her feet, is cunning, ambitious, and loves Macbeth. As a result of the king's death, his two sons flee so the murderers can not strike twice in quick secsession. Act 2 scene 4 follows the death of the king. As the king's sons have escaped to England and Ireland, there is a vacuum like atmosphere in the castle so Macbeth immediately seizes the opportunity to be in control. Pathetic fallacy is used in this scene to demonstrate what goes on in the world echoes the happenings in the castle. It is suggested that the nature is reflecting the murder of the king with foolish weather and strange animal behaviour: "Was by a mousing owlhawked at and killed." (2.4). It is odd that an owl kills a falcon but likewise are the events in the castle. Macbeth realises in order to be king, suspicious Banquo has to die as he knows too much: "Thou has it [the crown] now," (3.1) ...read more.

Conclusion

(5.3). At the end he still shows love for his wife so cannot be wholly a bad person: "How does your patient, doctor?" Also, with Lady Macbeth unwell, Macbeth can still take control of situation. He shows his independence when organising the doctor and Seyton under limited time as the army raised by Macduff approaches. As the play approaches its climax, Macbeth is determined not to show any signs of vulnerability although the end is near and he knows it: "But, bear-like, I must fight the course." (5.7) Eventually Macbeth was defeated by the prophecy: "None of woman born shall harm Macbeth" (4.1) but died fighting, against Macduff, till the end showing bravery. Lady Macbeth died too: "Took off her life" (5.9) as she could not cope with her terrifying deeds. In the end Scotland has become a safer place and a positive life can be looked forward to with the return of the people that fled. Macbeth started off as a brave warrior but with the help of Lady Macbeth, showing him what he can achieve, turned him into a brave warrior who can be dominant and ruthless. Lady Macbeth started ambitious but ultimately could not cope with the strain of supporting Macbeth. ?? ?? ?? ?? David Rankin Macbeth Essay 1685 words 15/03/2009 Page 1 of 3 GCSE English ...read more.

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