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oliver twist

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Introduction

Amber Swallow English Miss Woods 10s/sa 17th December 06 Task: Oliver Twist is an extreme criticism of Victorian society's treatments of the poor. Explore how Dickens presents his views about class divisions and the suffering of the poor in any two chapters. Throughout the novel of Oliver Twist, Dickens portrays his feelings and strong views towards Victorian society's treatment of the poor and also about class divisions. I am going to write about two chapters and explore them in depth. Firstly I will explore chapter two and show how it represents the treatment of the poor. First of all in chapter two Dickens introduces us to young Oliver Twist; a boy who has been in care since the day he was delivered into this world of cruelty as an orphan baby. "Oliver was the victim of treachery and deception" In these words Dickens Is trying to tell the reader that the middle class were dishonest, they couldn't be trusted. Dickens's father was sent to prison due to financial problems by the middle class. He himself was bullied by a member of the middle class, during working in the blacking factory. ...read more.

Middle

Later in this chapter Oliver is taken to the workhouse. He joined many other lonely miserable children, leading abnormal lives. They worked hard constantly all day everyday. They only stopped at meal times, but it wasn't much of a meal, all they were given was a bowl of thin porridge called "gruel", it was hardly enough to keep them alive. In 1834 the poor law was introduced, people who worked in these factories were given suitable amounts of food and worked average hours. But the upper class believed they were getting it easy, and enjoying themselves to much, living on free food and leading a life not having the worry of feeding their families. So the system made a dramatic change. The food was cut down to the bear minimum (extreme rationing) and they were forced to work long tiring hours. Basically the middle classes intentions were to slowly starve and work them to death, to make them suffer. They just wanted them to make money for themselves; to them they were just workers, like machines, the upper class controlled them, and the poor just accepted and went along with it, they had no power over their own feelings and rights. ...read more.

Conclusion

The significance of his name makes his personality sound immoral, like he is a sharp person. He is seen as the devil, having fang teeth, trying to get his teeth into anybody and drag them down. This links to how the Beadle acts towards the children. This resulted in Oliver; he didn't have a voice, while stood nervously in front of the magistrate. He was unable to speak for himself at this point, like he didn't have the right. People believed the poor shouldn't have a say because they will always be guilty. They judged those unfortunate and made them appear troublesome. Dickens betrays the magistrate he creates him as being a drunken man and all over the place. He is also comical, the magistrate tries to pin the blame on anybody, and he even accuses Mr Brownlow of stealing the book asking, "Is it paid for?" It demonstrates how Mr Fang just wanted to find someone guilty so he could depart from the office. To sum up I believe Dickens defends the lower class and shows in detail how the poor were treated. Also how unequal the two class divisions were. I believe he wrote this novel to get people to understand how life was, and how different it was, showing people today the good changes that have happened. ...read more.

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