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'Oliver Twist,' and how the work of Charles Dickens is widely based upon the social conditions of the period

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� 57����4�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0�*bjbj�2�2 (6�X�X��������������������8� ��/v�������$�R�2������|||���|�||���� �MgC���X���0/�) r ) �������) �� |��|The work of Charles Dickens is widely based upon the social conditions of the period. The novel 'Oliver Twist' presents the conditions of life at the time, and the largely exaggerated characters portray the nature of the people then. This is in an attempt to confront some of the issues of the time, including poverty and disease, both of which were extremely common in Victorian England. Dickens has used fictional characters to communicate his views on the situations that arose at the time of writing. There are some serious topics addressed in this book, and Dickens begins the story with the very start of Oliver's life. The novel opens with the orphan boy's entrance into the world, according to Dickens as an 'it'. He writes, "�It was ushered into this world of sorrow and trouble by the parish surgeon". This quote suggests that Oliver was not even seen as a valued human life, but rather as an object to be despised. He also talks about Oliver as being "The item of mortality", so Oliver's death is being talked about before his life has even begun. This suggests that the parish feel resentment towards Oliver, and we later see that this is felt towards him throughout most of his life. ...read more.

Middle

Right from Mr Gamfield's entrance we are wary and suspicious of him, and do not trust him as a potential master for Oliver. Mr Gamfield also hits his donkey "as a caution not to run away in his absence", and this also relates to the way in which Oliver would probably be treated by him, because he probably would attempt to run away at some point. Then to make matters worse, we gain a dislike for the gentleman in the white waistcoat, as we are told that he thinks that "Mr Gamfield was exactly the sort of master Oliver Twist wanted." When Mr Limbkins states, "It's a nasty trade", this demonstrates two things. The first is that he is actually showing some compassion towards Oliver, and the second is that he is actually trying to take his responsibility seriously. He is not willing to just get rid of Oliver as soon as possible, but wants to be certain that he will be taken care of. The gentleman in the white waistcoat then changes his mind and agrees with Mr Limbkins. However, the original low opinion of Mr Limbkins that we are given, is a false one. Mr Limbkins wants rid of Oliver as much as anyone else. He is actually just haggling with Mr Gamfield and trying to hide this fact. ...read more.

Conclusion

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