• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

One's Self I Sing

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

One's Self I sing: paraphrase One's Self I sing, a simple separate person Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse. I sing for myself, as an individual man, Who say the word Democratic and the word En-Masse. Of physiology from top to toe I sing, Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I say The Form complete is worthier far, The Female equally with the Male I sing. I sing with the whole body, Because neither face nor brain alone is worthy to the muse, The united of all is that worthier, I sing to equality of Male and Female. Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful, for freest form'd under the laws divine, The Modern Man I sing. Life is enormous with passion, pulse and power, So cheerful for freedom under the holy law, I sing to Modern Man. One's Self I sing: analysis First of all, due to the final version of Leaves of Grass in 1891 begins its contents with this poem. ...read more.

Middle

The citation of Democracy and Unity traces us to cultural context during the time. Whitman valued Democracy the most significance because he was a man of the Civil War which was the process to get Democracy, and from which thousands live had paid. Yet at the same time, as believed to be the epic of American, the second stanza of One's Self I sing emphasizes that the poem, perhaps Whitman himself, speaks in the name of all Americans; Of physiology from top to toe I sing, Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I say The Form complete is worthier far, The Female equally with the Male I sing. The first line--Of physiology from top to toe I sing-which can be paraphrased into I sing from the whole body refers to everybody in America, from highest to lowest classes, and also reemphasizes the property they have valued, Unity. Concurrently, the second and the third line expresses some ideas that quite absorbing. Let us focus on figurative language involved in the lines. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whitman performed the second stanza as a perfect guideline of "individual to mass" that apparently is the theme of his poem. Spontaneously, he brought readers back to the significance of Democracy again in the last stanza; Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful, for freest form'd under the laws divine, The Modern Man I sing. As he indicated the laws divine and The Modern Man I sing he underlined the remarkable value of Democracy. However, if we examine the stanza thoroughly, we may discover that once more Whitman had raised the idea of transcendentalism. Focusing on alliteration employed in the first line-- passion, pulse, and power-it insists the importance of self-absorbing, which mainly concerned in transcendentalism, that how immense a life will be if a man can act freely from his soul. In conclusion, the poem One's Self I sing is worthy to read not only because it is regarded as "American epic", but also in the way Whitman raised a question that is essential to the world today that how can one be an individual person and yet be a citizen, a part of society, which also has an identity. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Other Poets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Other Poets essays

  1. Poetry English language

    The people in the Boer War used rifles and guns, whereas the weaponry in Agincourt was hand to hand combat, you had to see the soldiers to kill them. In this War you could shoot from a far range, so the chance of killing somebody is more predictable.

  2. English Poetry Coursework

    help to get freedom cannot be impossible when a person can move out and about. 'Whom you bought and sold', as in the early days there used to slaves who used to be bought and sold also done by trading.

  1. Comparing Poems from different cultures

    One of these pictures is waves breaking, which is another reminder of how much the island man longs to be back at home. The other is a picture of a city, such as London, which could be showing that no matter where the Island Man looks, he always sees London.

  2. Romeo and Juliet Act 1 Scene 5

    Capulet is in a cheerful mood along with all his guest, but then Tybalt cuts Capulet's mood by making a fuss about Romeo's presence. This is the part of the scene where Capulet has very interesting contrasts in moods between his guest and Tybalt.

  1. War Poetry

    The second stanza is written for a first person point of view, and is used because Owen in this stanza is describing what is happening to another soldier and is putting across a very personal account of what he saw and heard.

  2. How does Shakespeare use dramatic devices in Act 3 Scene 1 of Romeo and ...

    taunting is like a small diversion that creates suspense among the reader. Shakespeare contrasts this scene with the previous scene Act 2 Scene 6, as there is a romantic vibe and atmosphere in the scene as they are in the Friars cell and upon the Friar advising them on moderation of love.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work