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Oscar Wilde

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Introduction

Adam Wright 18th November 2002 Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde himself would probably admit that his life had many incredible events that themselves would make an exceedingly gripping play, his unequalled rise to become the chief celebratory of his day and his dramatic fall from grace due to his arch rival, lord Queensbury. Oscar Wilde was born among the highest social circles of Dublin Ireland to two very unique and individual parents. His father was widely regarded as the best eye and ear surgeon in the whole of Great Britain and is still today looked upon as the founder of that specific medical branch. His mother, a self-proclaimed genius, was a committed feminist and a key member and open supporter of The Irish independence movement. This unusual couple formed a cornerstone of Irish society who mixed with royalty somewhat. Straight away from even my limited reading we can tell that Wilde wrote within parameters that he felt comfortable and knowledgeable within. ...read more.

Middle

Oscar Wilde was schooled in the fashion that was expected of the upper middle classes at that time. When he was old enough he was sent to the top public school in Ireland at that time, The Portora Royal School. His headmaster, a good friend of his father, was extremely keen on the classics and this was reflected upon in the schools syllabus. Wilde won many prizes even though he was widely regarded as sloppy and this signalled the start of a distinguished education. Wilde then moved first to Trinity College in Dublin where he won a succession of academic awards. Wilde then prospered in his third centre of education Magdalen College, Oxford. Oscar was popular with teachers and pupils alike. He was so popular with his lecturers that he spend four months with one of the most influential lecturers touring Greece and Italy. At one point he even had a personal audience with the Pope due to Wilde's ability at writing religious sonnets. ...read more.

Conclusion

Bosie's father, Lord Queensbury, who was the creator of the famous boxing rules that share his name, became increasingly concerned at his sons actions. He scoured London for information to prove his claim. Inexplicably during this search Wilde began liable proceedings that he was advised he would defiantly lose. Why Wilde took these actions is open to debate but I personally believe that he believed that the same cockiness and comic wit that he used in his plays so successfully could be harnessed to fight against the impressive authority of the British judicial system. Wilde crumpled after a spectacular defeat. Following the disaster he spent three years in prison When Wilde left prison he was denied the right to see Constance his wife (which he didn't mind) and his children (which he did). He fled to Paris in France to live out his life. A short romantic reunion with Bosie collapsed after a mere three months and Wilde waited out three lonely years till death in Paris. Abandoned by his peers he died alone and arrogance free in a bare, poorly furnished hotel room in Paris. ...read more.

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