• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Othello Act 3 Scene 3

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Othello Act 3 Scene 3 This Shakespearean play is a moving tragedy that should never have happened. Had Othello not been insecure in his marriage due to his colour and age and his extreme trusting in Iago, this tragedy would not have happened. Othello is a black, valiant and respected general who I would describe as a very dignified and eloquent gentleman with a beautiful description of speech. Iago on the other hand is a very bitter, jealous man who sets out for the title of lieutenant and stops at nothing to get his wish. He is a racist man who is deliberate in his malicious actions, although knows full well that it is wrong. He has many edges to his complex character, which is shown in scene 3 act 3. Iago plays on Othello's insecurities, which makes it very easy for Iago to place doubts in Othello's mind about Desdemona faithfulness with Cassio. ...read more.

Middle

He also implies that Venetian women have affairs but are discrete about it. Othello starts to doubt why Desdemona loves him. Iago realises doubts are setting in and intentionally refers to colour, class etc on why Desdemona is with Othello, in the deliberate realisation that Othello will be offended and stops by saying "pardon me" (3,3,237). In Othello's soliloquy his thoughts are not rational and he comes to the conclusion that his marriage is over and Desdemona has been unfaithful. He feels strongly that if this is true then he would not share her with other men when he ends by saying "for others uses" (3,3,276). The handkerchief, which Emelia steals for Iago, is the most crucial symbol and object in the play that confirms to Othello that Desdemona has been unfaithful. Iago plots to plant it on Cassio as proof to Othello of the affair. Othello is tormented in his thoughts and believes he cannot ever sleep or be content when he says " Nor all the drowsy syrups in the world..." ...read more.

Conclusion

Iago says he is completely faithful to Othello, and passes any blame for what he is about to do and is convincingly at Othello's service. Iago is a villain who wears a mask of virtue. Othello orders Iago to kill Cassio, which he agrees to do, but tries to change his mind about killing Desdemona. By the end of this scene Iago has got what he sets out to achieve. He set out to disgrace Cassio and gain his position as lieutenant along with abusing the moor's ear. Othello reacts in a more passionate and extreme way than Iago expected. He now has to take the plot further than he anticipated. Othello in his extreme passion has made a decision that Desdemona must die. I feel this tragedy happened because of one man's selfish obsession for power and status which he gains at everyone's expense, even his own! Angie Masson 20/04/07 1 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Othello essays

  1. othello. DISCUSS THE DRAMATIC IMPACT OF ACT 1 SCENE 3 AND ITS IMPORTANCE TO ...

    Iago's final two lines are the most evil and dastardly of his sentences so far: " Hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth top the world's light" Iago ends with rhyming couplets to emphasize to the audience that he is going to do what he has just planned.

  2. Othello - Examine the importance and effectiveness of Act III, scene 3, considering the ...

    know that Iago is not what he seems and never shows any of the other characters what he is really like: a scheming, cunning person. Throughout the play Iago constantly changes his character in order to act differently around different people for his plans to work and to also get the reactions he wants.

  1. Analyse the style and structure of Othello, Act 3 scene 3, showing what it ...

    Iago exposes his 'thoughts' on Cassio's and Desdemona's relationship. Othello becomes astound and inquisitive but he asks Iago to leave so he can think upon this information.

  2. Discuss the dramatic impact of Act 1 Scene 3 and its importance to the ...

    Shakespeare shows this through the character of Brabantio. Brabantio say: "Brabantio: my daughter! O my daughter Senators: Dead? Brabantio: Ay to me She is abused, stol'n from me and corrupted" This interjection of 'O' shows that just because Desdemona has left Brabantio, in Brabantio's eyes she is considered dead to him.

  1. Discuss and evaluate how Shakespeare uses language to present the character of Othello in ...

    He reluctantly, gives the couple his blessing. Desdemona is unique because she can see past the colour of Othello's skin and falls in love with Othello's impressive history and his intellectual outlook on life. Desdemona is used as a tool that indicates the dramatic breakdown in Othello's language, she supports her husband's eloquence and dramatically props him up publically.

  2. Direct act 3 scene 3 of Othello.

    He winds himself round and round Othello, squeezing him, strangling him but Othello doesn't notice, he is killing himself without knowing, he is ending his marriage without knowing, he's doing all this without knowing and it's working. Iago persuades Othello that what he believes to be happening is right, and

  1. "Othello" act 3, scene 3.

    Another one of Iago's skills that set him aside as a consummate dissembler is his ability to take advantage of any situation that may arise and use it to his advantage: "Hah? I like not that." Iago says this as he enters the stage and as Cassio leaves.

  2. Director's notes Act 3 Scene 3 of Othello.

    Set in the gardens of the Government mansion, Desdemona and Emilia her maid are enjoying the beautiful gardens and then from Stage left Cassio appears in order to talk with Desdemona. The lighting is strong to represent a summer's day.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work