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Othello Act 3 Scene 3

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Introduction

Othello Act 3 Scene 3 This Shakespearean play is a moving tragedy that should never have happened. Had Othello not been insecure in his marriage due to his colour and age and his extreme trusting in Iago, this tragedy would not have happened. Othello is a black, valiant and respected general who I would describe as a very dignified and eloquent gentleman with a beautiful description of speech. Iago on the other hand is a very bitter, jealous man who sets out for the title of lieutenant and stops at nothing to get his wish. He is a racist man who is deliberate in his malicious actions, although knows full well that it is wrong. He has many edges to his complex character, which is shown in scene 3 act 3. Iago plays on Othello's insecurities, which makes it very easy for Iago to place doubts in Othello's mind about Desdemona faithfulness with Cassio. ...read more.

Middle

He also implies that Venetian women have affairs but are discrete about it. Othello starts to doubt why Desdemona loves him. Iago realises doubts are setting in and intentionally refers to colour, class etc on why Desdemona is with Othello, in the deliberate realisation that Othello will be offended and stops by saying "pardon me" (3,3,237). In Othello's soliloquy his thoughts are not rational and he comes to the conclusion that his marriage is over and Desdemona has been unfaithful. He feels strongly that if this is true then he would not share her with other men when he ends by saying "for others uses" (3,3,276). The handkerchief, which Emelia steals for Iago, is the most crucial symbol and object in the play that confirms to Othello that Desdemona has been unfaithful. Iago plots to plant it on Cassio as proof to Othello of the affair. Othello is tormented in his thoughts and believes he cannot ever sleep or be content when he says " Nor all the drowsy syrups in the world..." ...read more.

Conclusion

Iago says he is completely faithful to Othello, and passes any blame for what he is about to do and is convincingly at Othello's service. Iago is a villain who wears a mask of virtue. Othello orders Iago to kill Cassio, which he agrees to do, but tries to change his mind about killing Desdemona. By the end of this scene Iago has got what he sets out to achieve. He set out to disgrace Cassio and gain his position as lieutenant along with abusing the moor's ear. Othello reacts in a more passionate and extreme way than Iago expected. He now has to take the plot further than he anticipated. Othello in his extreme passion has made a decision that Desdemona must die. I feel this tragedy happened because of one man's selfish obsession for power and status which he gains at everyone's expense, even his own! Angie Masson 20/04/07 1 1 ...read more.

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