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Othello - Act 3.

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Introduction

Zahra Kiyani Read the following extract from Act 3. What might be the thoughts and feelings of an audience as they watch this past of the scene? In your answer you should: o Show in detail how characterisation, atmosphere and dramatic qualities are created by Shakespeare's choice of language. o Express your own thoughts and feelings about this scene at this point in the play, as well as suggesting how their audiences might react to it. o Show some awareness of dramatic climax and the conventions of the tragic hero. At this point in the play Othello is on the point of being convinced that Desdemona is having an affair with Cassio. This is a huge turning point in the play; we can feel the tension through the language that Shakespeare uses. "Give me living reason that she is disloyal", you can sense Othello's fury through the word "living", you can almost feel Othello's hurt and anger through the words he speaks. Iago, who seems to be the one in control here, takes command and tells Othello what he heard Cassio say whilst sleeping. " Sweet Desdemona, Let us be wary, let us hide our loves, ...Sweet Creature!". ...read more.

Middle

For example when Othello says "If it be that-", and Iago finishes off his sentence for him, "If it be that, or any that was hers, it speaks against her with the other proofs". The fact that Iago finishes off the sentence for Othello, gives us the idea that Iago believes that he is of slightly higher status and has more control and power at this moment. It shows how low Othello has gone - he needs Iago to finish off his sentence for him, as if Iago was his brother, friend or even leader. "O that the slave had forty thousand lives! One is too poor, too weak for my revenge. Now do I see 'tis true". These word when joined sound like he is summoning a demon or is casting a spell, we begin to feel a little frightened of what Othello is capable of. Othello is convinced, and all his "fond love" for Desdemona- " Tis gone!". This one-liner has a big effect and we realise it is of huge importance. His love for Desdemona has gone and Iago has succeeded. "O blood, blood blood", "O monstrous monstrous". ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare has used the use of language well, when Othello is convinced that Desdemona has had an affair, his poetry and prose stop, and begins to talk a lot like Iago. "Goats and Monkeys...". Shakespeare's use of language adds a lot to the amount of tension and suspense involved. Along with Othello's use of one-liners', "O monstrous, monstrous, monstrous" and "O blood, blood, blood", and Iago finishing off Othello's sentences for him. Tells and shows us how Iago has managed to gain control over Othello, and Othello who believes Iago has experience in these matters and knows "my country disposition well". The fate of poor Othello, is left in the hands of Iago and whether he 'mucks up' or not. There have been plenty of times when Iago could have come out into the light and be shown what he is really " worth ". "Iago beckons me: now he begins the story" - Othello and Iago has to change the subject hastily before he revealed, "Before me! Look where she comes!". We are also reminded of Brabantio said to Othello ""I would keep from thee"...Othello said, "To seel her father's eyes up..." Othello was reminiscing of what Brabantio said and has realised that it is slowly coming true. ...read more.

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