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Othellos tragic flaw is his jealousy. His feelings of inadequacy are felt sharply though his colour and the fact that he does not actually belong in Venice.

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Introduction

English Coursework Othello's tragic flaw is his jealousy. His feelings of inadequacy are felt sharply though his colour and the fact that he does not actually belong in Venice. He is an outsider, and although he is eloquent and brave he doesn't feel that he is part of that society in the way he should be. He does have respect: when he tells the people to put up their arms in Act 1 Scene 2, they listen to him and do as he says. ...read more.

Middle

mother showed To you, preferring you before your father, So much I challenge that I may profess Due to the Moor my lord." Othello actually has no reason to be jealous at any point during the play, but Iago's cunning manipulation plays on his insecurities. The handkerchief is set up as a deliberate plot to stir up trouble between Othello, Desdemona and Cassio. Othello is led to believe in the truth of his wife's infidelity through her hand holding with Cassio when they arrived, to her speaking to Othello on his behalf when Othello has turned him out of his position for his drunken brawl. ...read more.

Conclusion

Had he not been so impulsive and so quick to assume the worse, Iago would have failed. His jealous rage made him kill Desdemona, and then he was unable to live with himself once he realised the truth. As to whether he deserved his fate or not, many people would blame events on Iago. Without question, Iago is the one who controls most of what happens for his own ends during the play. However, Othello himself has to accept some of the responsibility. He is not a total innocent like Desdemona, and he allowed Iago to manipulate him into jealousy of Desdemona and Cassio. ...read more.

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