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Out, out..." by Robert Frost.

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Introduction

"Out, Out..." Essay Jamie Gavin "Out, out..." by Robert Frost is a narrative poem that outlines, in a certain way, the dangers of letting a child do a man's work. The boy, whom we find to be young, has an unfortunate accident with a buzz saw resulting in the boy's death. The poet uses language structure and characterisation to convey the tragic circumstances in which the boy is killed. I found the poem to contain a lot of information, with almost half the poem devoted to describing just a few seconds around the accident. The unexpected ending to the poem was thought provoking and made me aware of how a fatal accident can arise from a moment's lapse in concentration - I felt this was good. ...read more.

Middle

The poet uses the structure of the poem to emphasise the tragic circumstances of the boy's death. Frost develops the mood of the poem from a calm and peaceful beginning that uses the senses to convey the sleepy, relaxed atmosphere, for example "Five mountain ranges one behind other" is a perfect description of the surroundings using the sense of sight. The mood suddenly changes when the accident happens to one of regret, which soon turns to fear. This, once again, exemplifies the boy's immaturity. The onlookers were shocked when they saw what had happened and were even more shocked when the boy suddenly died as a result. This is illustrated by the words, "And then - the watcher at his pulse took fright. ...read more.

Conclusion

The poet uses short sentences to build up a crescendo before the suddenness of the boy's death. "Little-less-nothing;- and that ended it" The use of the "Little-less-nothing" exemplifies the fact that the boys life was fading away, his heart got slower and slower until it stopped. The words, "No more to build on there" are significant because they emphasise the fact that it is a young life cut short, and the boy will never fulfil his potential now. I felt the poet conveyed the tragic circumstances leading to the boy's death excellently using characterisation, structure and language techniques. I found it sad and strange that the fellow workers just resumed their usual work even though a young boy's life has just been lost. I enjoyed the poem and found it very thought provoking. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

There are some apt points made in this response, and language, structure and form are all considered to some extent. As a GCSE response there needs to be more detailed analysis of the poem and some connections made to real life contexts and the messages the poem conveys.

4 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 07/08/2013

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