• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Outline Jack’s rise to power. You should use evidence from the early days when Ralph was the leader, through to the time when Jack became chief of his own tribe.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Q: Outline Jack's rise to power. You should use evidence from the early days when Ralph was the leader, through to the time when Jack became chief of his own tribe. Jack, throughout the story, has been portrayed as the sign of evil. But of the other characters who are also portrayed in a similar way, one very important factor that Jack stands out from the rest is because of his leadership. Right from chapter 1, we are first introduced to him as the leader of the choirboys, he was already able to get his choir to be "wearily obedient". This gives us a very strong impression that his has a firm and authoritive control over them large number of boys. Slightly lately from the scene which happened above, Ralph called for a vote for a chief. At that instant, Jack exclaimed, saying 'I ought to be chief'. We can see that his own confidence in his leadership over his choir prompts him to believe he is able to lead all of the other boys as well. ...read more.

Middle

The boys on the beach spotted a ship and looked to see if the fire signal was there, but it was not. They then ran up the mountain to see what had happened, and found that Samneric, the two responsible for the fire at that time, were not there. At the height of Ralph's anger and frustration over the fire, Jack, along with the twin and the other hunters, appear on of the mountain with a pig they killed. After Ralph's scolding, Jack again did something similar to what he did earlier. He apologized for letting the fire out, and it was received by his hunters with 'admiration at the handsome behavior', putting Ralph in the wrong. This deed of Jack's made Ralph look like the more incapable of the two elder biguns. Later on, when they were eating the meat of the pig, Simon refused the portion Jack gave him. This resulted in Jack trying to reinstate his position as the provider of food, when he shouted 'I got you meat' to him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Once again, Jack does the same thing as before, trying to do something that would clam the fears of the little ones, while Ralph has failed in doing so. This allows Jack to portray himself a capable leader, unlike Jack, who one have meetings to talk about their fears. Finally, in chapter 8, when the 3 main big ones confirm the existence of the beast, there is much confusion among all the boys. This is when Jack tries to cease his chance again to be chief instead of Ralph. First, he took the conch away from Ralph and blew it to call for a meeting. This is a first, since Ralph has always been the one blowing the conch since chapter 1, and is a sign of Jack trying outright to take power from Ralph. In the final push, he ask for a vote if they wanted him to be chief instead of Ralph, after telling lies, outlining the failures of Ralph and a slight tiff with him. However, when Jack fails to become chief on votes, he leaves the group with some other boys to form his own tribe. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Compare and contrast Ralph and Jack’s leadership skills

    That night Jack tells a gang o people from his group to invade Piggy's shelter, to ruin it and while doing that to take his glasses to make fire to. The following morning Ralph and Piggy go and ask for the glasses back but Jacks group just throw stones and end up killing Piggy.

  2. Discuss the depiction of unhappy families in O'Caseys 'Juno and the Paycock'.

    Like her mother, Mary, too is a worker who has helped to support men folk in the Boyle family also Mary's spirit, which makes her a fighter for workers', rights and an enthusiastic member of her trade union. On the other hand, her vanity reveals her fathers genes.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work