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Over View of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

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Introduction

Over View: The story of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley is about a man who created something that messes with nature, and nature came back to mess with him because nature is more powerful than man. Victor Frankenstein was very interested in natural philosophy and chemistry and basically tried to play G-d by creating life. When he found the secret of activating dead flesh, he created a superhuman being composed of rotted corpses. What he did was considered unthinkable, and he was haunted by his own creation. When the monster escaped, Frankenstein knew that he had to deal with the consequences of what the monster might do. Frankenstein received a letter one day which informed him of his younger brother William's murder, and immediately suspected that he was responsible, for he was the creator of the hideous monster. A friend of the family named Justine Moritz was the "presumed" murderer, and Frankenstein was determined to prove her innocent. Circumstantial evidence, however, led the courts to believe Justine guilty, because found in her pocket was a photograph which had belonged to William. Justine had been put to death, and Frankenstein had yet to find his creation. ...read more.

Middle

If he had taken the time to analyze his own feelings, he could have avoided such a huge conflict that arose from him feeling the way he did. Shelley incorporates the theme of loneliness in this way to teach audiences that one can be satisfied as long as they allow them self to be. If Frankenstein had allowed his self to be happy with whom and what he had in life before creating his creature, many problems that developed in the story may have easily been avoided. In Frankenstein, Mary Shelley also uses the character, Frankenstein's creature to convey another form of loneliness that allows readers to further understand this character. The creature's loneliness causes him to perform horrible actions such as murder, because he too desires a companion. In order to obtain this companion, the creature continues to kill whom ever it comes in contact with until he comes in contact with Frankenstein himself, so that he can demand that the doctor create a mate for this creature. Although this creature seems to be a victim of his own ignorance, he does express human emotions and feels as if his troubles will also be over when he gets a companion. ...read more.

Conclusion

"...and tell me why should I pity man more than he pities me?" the creature asks Frankenstein. "Shall I respect man when he contemns [sic] me?" (122) The creature is not a monster in his own eyes; he is behaving rationally given the treatment he has received. If he were taught a better way to act, he would almost certainly behave in that way. The monster is not born a monster, his ugliness notwithstanding; he becomes one because society behaves monstrously towards him. Frankenstein, on the other hand, has lived within society and is expected to have certain morals. Among these should include parental responsibility, an obligation to care for the being to whom he has given life. No matter how repulsive his "child" is to look at, he should love and care for it. Not to do so is to behave like a monster. Although the creature does things which are horrifying, he is much less monstrous than Frankenstein, who acts with indifference to society and hatred towards his creation. While the creature cannot be without blame for the deaths of Frankenstein's family, it was Frankenstein who brought it about through his monstrous treatment of the creature. It is actions that reveal if one is truly a monster, and Victor Frankenstein's selfishness and lack of compassion definitely place him in that category. ...read more.

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