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Personal Narrative. For all six years of my life, Ive always believed what others have told me to believe. After all, I havent managed to see the world like the adults. All of my knowledge of the world was based on T.V.

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Introduction

"Shhh!" my mom whispered into my ear. I closed my eyes and held my breath. Sure enough, there it was: a crisp echo entered my ear, the sound bouncing off the twists and turns of the spiral shell. A mysterious place I have so often seen on television, a land so magical that it lives inside the object I hold in my hands. I could hear the wide open space, I could imagine the taste of the salt in the humid air, and I could dream of the sand between my toes. "Can you hear the ocean?" I was taken aback. I didn't know what the ocean really sounded like. I've never heard the wide open space, never tasted the humid air, and never felt the sand between my toes. I've seen the ocean in my living room but never where it actually was. For all six years of my life, I've always believed what others have told me to believe. ...read more.

Middle

All the time I would try to peek inside for a glimpse of the unknown. But the maze of winding turns blocked my view. How could the wide expanse of the ocean fit into something a six-year-old could hold in his two hands? How could the water - something that blotted the globe sitting in my room - be so elusive? Frustrated, I sneaked down to the basement one night to find a hammer. If the ocean wouldn't come out to greet me, I knew I had to go in and find it. To my surprise the shell was tougher than I expected and the hammer was heavier than I imagined. I gave up. The shell taunted me for over a year. My night-time dreams continued to be flooded with images of the world - a world I had yet to see. Finally, on a sticky summer day, reality came. We went to the beach - the first time since I was born. ...read more.

Conclusion

As I picked it up I noticed something was living inside, breathing the same air I was breathing and probably just as curious at the world as I was. But I knew it was trapped. It would never be able to come out to see what I could see. My mom approached an saw the shell in my hands. "Can you hear the ocean?" I didn't reply. Anyone could hear the ocean. I was actually there. Word count: 767 ?? ?? ?? ?? Gorick Ng DRAFT 1 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM APPLICATION PART D The following words are offered as a stimulus to thought and discussion and are open to open interpretation: age, spiral, spring, torch. Choose a topic or theme suggested by one or, if you prefer, by a combination of the words and write a short essay, formal or informal. Essays will be assessed on the basis of originality, coherence and clarity of expression. Applications whose essay does not clearly and directly relate to one or more of the prompts will be disadvantaged. Do not use any additional sources. (800 word maximum) Page 1 of 2 ...read more.

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