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Persuasive Response for Lord of the Flies

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Introduction

Persuasive Response for Lord of the Flies The Lord of the Flies is a classic novel and shouldn't be excluded from the Chanel College Curriculum. There are several reasons for this; Lord of the Flies has been read by millions of people all over the world. The strong moral values shown in the Lord of the Flies are also very hard to find in another book. The prestigious Nobel Prize was also earnt by William Golding for writing the Lord of the Flies, also many representations and the sheer reality of the novel exist. The themes in the Lord of the Flies alone are enough to save this novel from being removed from the curriculum. Several themes occur in the Lord of the Flies but the most significant is how society is closely related with its living conditions. William Golding also conveys that for society to be upheld there must be a certain level of moral value. In the school grounds students may single out one person to feel secure, this novel exaggerates this with the use of Piggy, but this only makes the message stronger that it isn't right to do that. ...read more.

Middle

The Lord of the Flies is no more violent or depressing than watching the news, it takes it a step further and makes people realize what is needed in a stable society, it attempts to stop the horror that is happening on the news. William Golding wants to show that society must depend on ethical nature and not on a political system because the political system only exists for society. Ralph and Piggy showed responsibility, they happened to be the only ones who had a bigger outlook on life and the only ones not to go insane. Ralph and Piggy didn't just 'live for the moment', looking into the big picture is a valuable lesson for students of the future and today. Golding shows that personal identity is needed from the way everyone lost their identity, they were separated into groups, which was either the 'littluns' or the 'biguns' and Sam and Eric became seen as one identity. Teaching students that a flawed society will lead to people's behavior going back to savagery will not only give the leaders of tomorrow the right values, it will give them a reason to use their power in the right way. ...read more.

Conclusion

These issues are more intriguing and interesting than any other book that could possibly replace the Lord of the Flies. The island is a microcosm of society; it is a small-scale world in which William Golding represented the things that were going on in society at the time. However Golding wrote the novel in the time of war, which is why the book is loosely based around World War two. Goldings attempt to explain the psychology of Nazi Germany is the biggest representation in the novel because it IS the novel. For example Hitler (Ralph) used his supreme power to control ordinary people (the rest of the gang) so that they stopped acting responsibly as individuals and depended more and more on him. The Lord of the Flies isn't just another book; it shows valuable morals and issues that you can't find in any other novel. History is intertwined with the Lord of the Flies, which just adds to the list of reasons why not to delete this novel from the curriculum. This book is more than just an action/adventure novel, it combines history, values and morals to create the best book in the Chanel College Curriculum. Why fix something that isn't broken? ...read more.

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