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Pip's Loss Of Innocence In The First Section Of Great Expectations.

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Introduction

Pip's Loss Of Innocence In The First Section Of Great Expectations I think that Pip's loss of innocence in Great Expectations starts at a young age and grows more and more noticeable throughout the book. It starts from the second chapter when he is forced into the crime of stealing a pork pie and some brandy from Mrs. Joe, yet more importantly, a file from Joe. It is more significant that he steals the file, as Joe has been the one who has helped this little boy grow up, and has been like a father (or even more) to him. Mrs. Joe, on the other hand has beaten him all his life and treated him like a prisoner. You get a real feel for this in the way that she always slips him threatening comments. ...read more.

Middle

Another big turning point in his life is when he lies to Mrs. Joe and Mr. Pumblechook about what Mrs. Havisham's house is like and what they did there. This is so significant as he is lying to them. This also leads to Pip, for the first time in his life deceiving his sister. This is the only way that he can get his own back on some of his family that he hates so greatly. Yet again it is only Joe is the only one that he feels really bad about deceiving. You can tell this by the way Pip says in chapter. "Now, when I saw Joe open his big blue eyes and roll them around the kitchen in helpless amazement, I was overtaken by penitence; but only as regarded him - not in the slightest the other two." ...read more.

Conclusion

He loves her and this is a great sign of his loss of innocence. He wants to impress her so much that he wants to change himself just for her. He even, in Chapter Thirteen goes as far as going against the one person who has given him everything he has, and prevented him from all harm. He feels embarrassed by Joe. When Joe gets taken to Mrs. Havisham's he looks absolutely stupid in Pip's eyes. He then even refuses to answer Mrs. Havisham directly and only speaks to Pip. This is when Pip sees Estellas laughing to herself about Joe. Pip feels ashamed of Joe and this is one of the points in his life that he realises that he wants to change. To become educated, to climb up the class ladder, he wants to do all this for the love of one person; Estella. ...read more.

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