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Poets of different centuries respond to the Natural world in very different ways. Discuss.

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Introduction

Poets of different centuries respond to the Natural world in very different ways. Discuss. Throughout the centuries, many different poets responded to nature in different ways. From Shakespeare's "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" to Wordsworth's early morning view of London in "Composed upon Westminster bridge" to Seamus Heaney's view over the field in "Digging." All these poets have responded in different ways to the world that lies around them. Shakespeare opens probably his most famous sonnet, with a question. "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" Since he believes the woman he is writing for is the most beautiful woman he has seen he wishes to compare her to the most beautiful thing he can this of in nature. He believes that to me a summer's day. However, he then goes on to say that a summer's day is not beautiful enough to describe her. ...read more.

Middle

Wordsworth was so touched by this remarkable sight that he felt compelled to write this personal sonnet. It is very clear from the fast rhythm that Wordsworth was excited at this rare sight. Moreover, the fact that he chose to write it in the form of a sonnet is very suitable because the sight he witnessed would only last a short time before the working day commenced. "Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty" The enjambment in this line clearly shows the poets delight in what he saw in the early morning London. Throughout the octave a crescendo can be heard building up Wordsworth's excitement, until the sestet when he slows down the rhythm to give a sense of calm. Furthermore, the abundant caesuras throughout the sonnet suggest breathless excitement. This sonnet is full of visual images such as the description of the landscape of London, "Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie" Wordsworth concludes his poem by saying that he had never before seen such a beautiful sight. ...read more.

Conclusion

In this poem, Heaney has broken away from the intellectual background of poetry so he can recall memories of his grandfather during his childhood. A mid-Ulster rural voice can be heard throughout the poem. This is in addition to all the other visual and aural images. An example of excellent aural imagery can be heard in the line, "The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap" Excellent alliteration can be seen here as well. An onomatopoeic effect can be heard on "squelch and slap," thus giving an excellent aural image. Poetic ideas have not changed much over the centuries. However, the form in which these ideas are conveyed have varied quite dramatically. From the Shakespearean Sonnets like "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" to Wordsworth's Petrarchan sonnet, "Composed upon Westminster Bridge" to the free verse form of Heaney in "Digging." These poems are all memorable in their own ways, Shakespeare for his elaborate images, Wordsworth for his dramatically different view of London and Heaney for his vivid images of his childhood memories. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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