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Porphyria's Lover and My Last Duchess.

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Introduction

Porphyria's Lover and My Last Duchess I am going to analyse the poems "Porphyria's Lover" and "My Last Duchess". These poems are very similar to each other, as I will be explaining further in this essay, because they both have similar subjects, both being killing and jealousy. Robert Browning, the contemporary English poet, writes both Porphyria's Lover and My Last Duchess. They both have murders and both have rages of jealousy and the two men in the poems have got to own their women, that is their psychological disabilities which have plagued their minds. The men's view on their women was that they should be treated as objects rather than actual human beings. Both women are kind and thankful to every person they see. They smile at everyone and even say "hello" to people, even if they don't know them, much to their lovers' dismay. In Porphyria's Lover, Porphyria is kind and understanding and is kind to everyone she sees, again even if she does not know them. If her lover was upset, she would go to him and make him feel happier." And last, she sat down by my side and called me. When no voice replied, she put my arm around her waist. This is important in the poem because it's the last thing she did and he is saying it will be the last thing she ever does. Porphyria's Lover wants to be the leader in their relationship and wants to control everything in it. "Be sure I looked up at her eyes happy and proud; at last I knew Porphyria worships me; surprise made my heart swell, and still it grew while I debated what to do." He is now saying that she worships him at last, and she now feels happy and proud. He is now certain that Porphyria worships him and only him and he is confident it will always be this way. ...read more.

Middle

I think this makes Porphyria's Lover more and more angry and this makes him NEED to kill her in his point of view. "But passion sometimes prevails nor could tonight's gay fest restrain a sudden thought of me so pale for love of her and all in vain." So she was come through wind and rain. This will annoy him because he wants her to be an object. In the middle of the poem, Porphyria's Lover begins to realise that Porphyria loves him when he looks up at her eyes and sees that they are happy and proud. She came back from the party just to be with him. "Be sure I looked up at her eyes happy and proud." Porphyria's Lover feels that at last she worships him. Browning uses the word to the importance of his mental anguish at the thought of her not being with him and being with her family. This is actually religious imagery in this line. "Porphyria worshipped me." Porphyria's Lover treats her as an object and not as a human being. He is very possessive and this possessiveness becomes a problem for him because, later on in the poem, we know that he becomes that obsessed with Porphyria tat he kills her. "That moment she was mine, mine, fair. Perfectly pure and good." He means that when she worships him, he feels she is clean and pure. But she was "Soiled" when she only loved him. He wants to capture the moment forever. He is now in control. The language used up until Porphyria's death is descriptive yet intense to make the reader of the poem want to read on and it certainly made me want to read. There is also a lot of imagery in this part of the poem such as "As a shut bud that holds a bee." This piece of imagery is relating to nature. ...read more.

Conclusion

"That's my last Duchess painted on the wall." The opening of the poem sees the Duke telling his feelings for his lover and her being an object. "I call that piece a wonder now." He is telling a visitor about a painting of The Duchess. The Duke is also enraged by his ex-wife's friendliness, revealing alliteration whilst spitting out his words. "Such stuff was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough for calling that spot of joy." The Duchess loved everything, including cherries that someone gave her just because of whom she was. She loved the sunset and she favoured everything. This makes the Duke very angry and he blabbers on about how the Duchess rates the gift of cherries more highly that his 900 year old name. "The dropping of the daylight in the West, the bough of cherries some officious fool broke in the orchard for her, the white mule she rode with around the terrace all and each would draw from her alike the approving speech, or blush, at least." The Duke killed the Duchess. I know this because The Duke explains he gave commands to "Stop all the smiles altogether." He planned it by thinking it through in his head and then giving his commands. The language used to get his feelings across to the visitor to say he kills her shows his cruel, callous, cold nature. Words like "Oh sir, she smiled, no doubt, whenever I passed her, but who passed without much the same smile?" I think he killed his wife because he just could not talk about his feelings to her. He felt he was too proud to stoop down to her level and I think this reveals that he is a very proud man who thinks he is above everyone, something special. Now she is dead, I think the Duke feels he has tamed the Duchess. "Taming a sea-horse, thought a varity, which Claus Of Innsbruck cost in bronze for me!" By Thomas McCance 10PF/M1 ...read more.

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