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Post-1914 Poetry

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Introduction

Post-1914 Poetry Seamus Heaney Seamus Heaney was born in April 1939 in Northern Ireland. His father owned and worked fifty acres of farmland in County Derry in N.I. Patrick Heaney had always been committed to cattle-dealing. Seamus' parents died quite early in his life and so his uncle had to take care of him from then on. Heaney grew up as a country boy and attended the local primary school. When he was twelve he won a scholarship to St. Columb's College, a catholic boarding school situated in the city of Derry. Heaney moved to Belfast later in his life where he lived for fifteen years and then moved to the republic. ...read more.

Middle

The poem has seven three line stanzas called tercets, and each line holds five to ten words keeping the poem easy to read throughout. Heaney has chosen to use this stanza structure and line length because it builds up tension and keeps you in suspense. It is also easier to digest in small stanzas and I think he has done this for us to get the full effect of the poem. There is a rhyme scheme in the poem but is split into para-rhymes because it gives a flow to the poem and grasps the readers attention all the way through. Seamus Heaney uses lots of imagery in this poem to get the reader to really imagine how the animals were treated on the farm. ...read more.

Conclusion

The first thing that strikes me is an oxymoron which is used. "a frail metal sound", is the two opposite words. The sound of the brittle kittens hitting the solid metal bucket. In the second stanza there is alliteration of the letter "S" with "Soft" , "Scraping" , "Soon" , "Soused" , "Slung" and "Snout". This speeds up the poem and keeps the pace. Another oxymoron is used in the second stanza, "tiny din" states that the kittens are helpless and struggling. Dying almost. I have also picked up on Heaney's use of dialogue in the poem and in the third stanza, Heaney mentions about what Dan Taggart had said. "Sure isn't it better for them now?" It looks as if Dan is trying to make Seamus Heaney feel better about the situation. ?? ?? ?? ?? GCSE Coursework Thomas Butler Page 1 of 2 ...read more.

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