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Pride and Prejudice

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen Referring to the text why did Elizabeth reject Mr. Darcy's marriage proposal in Chapter 34? There are many reasons for Elizabeth rejecting Darcy's marriage proposal. Some stem from what he says and does during the proposal while others stem from their earlier meetings and his actions during them. From their earliest meeting at the ball Elizabeth thinks Mr. Darcy is arrogant and proud. He says that he wouldn't 'lower himself' to dance with anyone in the room except Bingley's sisters. This proves that he is extremely arrogant and thinks that everyone in the room except the Bingleys were 'below him'. After this incident, Wickham comes along and tells Elizabeth all about the unfair things done to him by Darcy. During the proposal Elizabeth tells Darcy that his 'character was unfolded in the recital I received from Wickham'. Moreover Darcy is sarcastic when he talks about Wickham's 'misfortunes. Yes, his misfortunes have been great indeed'. 'In vain have I struggled.....my feelings will not be repressed.' This is what Darcy says to Elizabeth when he proposes to her and suggests that he's being forced to propose. Darcy keeps emphasising the fact that Elizabeth and her family are below him. Darcy's 'sense of her inferiority-of its being a degradation'. He was fully assured that Elizabeth would accept this proposal because they are 'below him'. '...he had no doubt of a favourable answer......his countenance expressed real security'. Another reason for Elizabeth rejecting Darcy's proposal is the fact he separated her sister Jane and Bingley. She says that no consideration would tempt her marry the man who 'has been the means the ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister'. ...read more.

Middle

Darcy goes on to say that 'towards (Bingley) I have been kinder than towards myself.' Darcy's also being very hypocritical here as seen marrying the sister of the woman he told his best friend not to marry due to their status. And finally something to sum this all up, something that Elizabeth says to Darcy. 'From the very beginning-from the first moment, I may almost say-of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt you were the last person in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.' There are the reasons why Elizabeth rejected Darcy's proposal of marriage. Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen Referring to the text why did Elizabeth reject Mr. Darcy's marriage proposal in Chapter 34? There are many reasons for Elizabeth rejecting Darcy's marriage proposal. Some stem from what he says and does during the proposal while others stem from their earlier meetings and his actions during them. From their earliest meeting at the ball Elizabeth thinks Mr. Darcy is arrogant and proud. He says that he wouldn't 'lower himself' to dance with anyone in the room except Bingley's sisters. This proves that he is extremely arrogant and thinks that everyone in the room except the Bingleys were 'below him'. After this incident, Wickham comes along and tells Elizabeth all about the unfair things done to him by Darcy. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is what Darcy says to Elizabeth when he proposes to her and suggests that he's being forced to propose. Darcy keeps emphasising the fact that Elizabeth and her family are below him. Darcy's 'sense of her inferiority-of its being a degradation'. He was fully assured that Elizabeth would accept this proposal because they are 'below him'. '...he had no doubt of a favourable answer......his countenance expressed real security'. Another reason for Elizabeth rejecting Darcy's proposal is the fact he separated her sister Jane and Bingley. She says that no consideration would tempt her marry the man who 'has been the means the ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister'. Darcy's shows absolutely no remorse and is proud of splitting up Jane and Bingley. 'I have no wish of denying that I did everything in my power to separate my friend from your sister, or that I rejoice in my success.' Darcy goes on to say that 'towards (Bingley) I have been kinder than towards myself.' Darcy's also being very hypocritical here as seen marrying the sister of the woman he told his best friend not to marry due to their status. And finally something to sum this all up, something that Elizabeth says to Darcy. 'From the very beginning-from the first moment, I may almost say-of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt you were the last person in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.' There are the reasons why Elizabeth rejected Darcy's proposal of marriage. ...read more.

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