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Pride And Prejudice

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice Coursework Examine how Jane Austen conveys Elizabeth Bennet's changing attitudes to Darcy Pride and Prejudice was written in the late 18th century. At this time in history women and men had very different roles in society. The first line of the play says 'it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of good fortune must be in want of a wife'. In some ways this was a man's purpose in life; to make money, get married and have children. The very first line brings the reader into the novel and introduces some historical context into the story, this also suggests some of the behaviour that later follows in the novel. During these times in England there was a very rigid class system which most of the population were bound to and had to live their lives by. If you were of a higher class you were usually to marry someone of a similar class and the same follows as you go lower down the class scale. Men of higher status were very eligible bachelors and in high demand! There were only a few ways that single women were able to meet with these wanted men and one a ball was indeed one of these. Private balls were a place for match making and very fashionable among the wealthy upper middle class. ...read more.

Middle

out." "And what is your success?"I do not get on at all. I hear such different accounts of you as puzzle me exceedingly." In chapter 18 Miss Bingley tells Elizabeth a little about the history between Wickham and Darcy, how Wickham was the son of George Wickham his steward. She is in favour of Darcy and even Elizabeth's sisterJane takes Darcy's side. However, Elizabeth is so stubborn and prejudiced that she refuses to see anyone else's side of the argument and continues with her complete disregard of other opinions and thought. It is surprising in fact that she doesn't listen to Miss Bingley's side of things as her closest in the family. Elizabeth believes that Bingley's opinion of Wickham has been prejudiced by Darcy. Austen conveys Elizabeth's attitude of Darcy by getting her to talk to people who hold different opinions of him, so that she has to justify her own ideas about him. She doesn't even trust her own sister Jane, Austen makes sure the reader knows that Elizabeth is too prejudiced to be able to see anything other than the worst of Darcy, despite evidence otherwise. In chapter 34, Darcy surprises everyone and finally says to Elizabeth,' "In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." ...read more.

Conclusion

is in, bound by etiquette and rulesThis is first seen in chapter 3 at Mertyon ball where Darcy refuses to dance possibly due to his shy character or possibly because of his arrogant nature which means that he does not want to associate with the inferior, lower classes. From the start of the book we know about historical context and what was normal during these times, the novel keeps us involved by wanting to find out about what the happens to the characters, their changes and also what other stories evolve. Both the main characters have a metaphorical journey to go on with Darcy's pride and Elizabeth's prejudices; they each have a large, personal flaw. Darcy's journey is more of a learning curve than anything where he finds out that money, class and status are not absolutely everything in life. Elizabeth finds out that she must sometimes 'swallow' her pride and admit that maybe she could be wrong. Jane Austen tells us the story of the lives of these people and conveys their changing attitudes in many different ways. Austen develops the characters as the book goes along and we are cleverly given an insight through direct narration and dialogue between characters. Jane Austen effectively shows changing attitudes throughout this book and certainly coveys Elizabeth's the range of changing attitudes towards Darcy. They move from intolerance and intense dislike to admiration and love during the course of the novel. ...read more.

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