• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen is set in the Regency England period.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen is set in the Regency England period. I think that one of the most important aspects of the novel is dancing. The balls the five sisters attend are the key places for courtship rituals, Janes' first meeting with Mr bingley was at the Long's ball as was Elizabeths and Darcy's first meeting. Two of the main themes of the novel are courtship and marriage. The characters in pride and prejudice generally reveal their inner selves through their behaviour. Jane austen paid alot of attention to the dances and balls in the novel. Around the time in which the novel is set, a person's individual worth was judged through their performance on the dance floor. Some examples of the negatively judged include Lydia and Kitty Bennet with their shamless soldier chasing and excessive giggling on the dance floor and Lydia's scandalous affair with Wickham. ...read more.

Middle

bingley attempts to persuade Darcy into dancing with Elizabeth. Darcy refuses rather loudly stating that "She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me...."(chapter 3, Long Ball) Seemingly uncaring or has not realized that Elizabeth can hear every word he utters. But Elizabeth cares very much. She is detremined never to allow Darcy to have the pleasure of pointing out her weaknesses again. "...I could easily forget his pride, if he had not mortified mine."(chapter 4) The second incident occurs when Sir William Darcy puts Darcy in the spotlight and insists he invites Elizabeth to dance with him. But this time the once rejected Elizabeth is determined to refuse Darcy. "And taking her hand, (Sir William Lucas) wold have given it to Mr. Darcy, who although extremely suprised, was not unwilling to receive it, when she instantly drew back, and said with some discomposure to Sir William, 'Indeed, Sir, I have not the least intention of dancing. ...read more.

Conclusion

She is so surised she accepts his propsal without a secnd thought, wherupon he immediatly walks away. While dancing with darcy Elizabeth is "amazed at the dignity at which she was arrived in being allowed t stand opposite to Mr. Darcy, and reading in her neighbours' looks their equal amazement in beholding it"(Chapter 18, Netherfield Ball). The seriousness of Elizabth dancing with Dacry contrasts with her emabarressment of dancing with Mr.Collins. Unfortuntely for the couple, by the end of this last dance they part silently and are mutually uneasy over the feelings that the experience calls upon. Throughout Pride and prejudice, dance emphasizes the themes of courtship and marriage. Only after forming initial matches on the dance floor can Elizabeth and Darcy and jane and mingley progress to the next stage, which i scourtship which may then lead to marriage! Therefore dance fullfills its primary function in the novel, just as it did in Austen's society. Marriage was seen as a reflection of social status. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Jane Austen essays

  1. What effect do pride and prejudice have on Darcy and Elizabeth's relationship and how ...

    Bingley seems to find Jane Bennet extremely attractive; however Darcy makes a comment about Elizabeth by saying, "She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me." This comment mortifies Elizabeth's pride because this comment degrades her as being unattractive.

  2. An analytical commentary on Pride and Prejudice (emphasis: Chapter VI, pp. 21-23)

    Essentially, while Elizabeth praises Jane's adherence to spontaneous or instinctive romance, Charlotte chastises and censures her naivet´┐Ż. Indeed, in Pride and Prejudice polite society aspires to rape the ideal of love and marriage of all its intricacies - to reduce it down to an institution based on pragmatic convenience and social progression.

  1. Pride and Prejudice Chapter Summaries

    Lydia tells the sisters that she is trying to talk their father into taking them there over the summer. Lydia also talks a lot about Wickham, saying that the woman that he had been courting had gone to Liverpool, which means that Wickham won't marry her.

  2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

    Charlotte in Hunsford we learn of ways in which Charlotte gets around being or having to be in Mr Collins's company for example; Charlotte encourages Mr Collins to go in his garden and take regular exercise 'To work in his garden was one of his most respectable pleasures; and Elizabeth

  1. Comparison of Proposals in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

    The reader can only agree with Mr Bennett that "his cousin was as absurd" as he had hoped. The ridiculousness of Collins's self-absorption is pushed to the limit as he approaches Darcy, failing to notice the contempt with which Darcy responds to his introduction.

  2. Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen.

    Although in the end her judgements seem to be more accurate than Elizabeth's overall and do her much less harm: "is the end of all his friend's anxious circumspection! Of all his sister's falsehood and contrivance! The happiest, wisest, and most reasonable end!"(Chapter fifty-five)

  1. Explore in detail how Elizabeths views and actions are not of a Typical Regency ...

    Elizabeth is a woman that is portrayed very differently in the book compared to typical regency women. Throughout the book, we acknowledge that most women in the early 19th century are not independent or strong enough to show their real personality.

  2. Role of Convention in Courtship.

    He does, however, have a strong sense of honour and virtue. Though Darcy is intelligent and honest, his excess of pride causes him to look down on his social inferiors. Over the course of the novel, he tempers his class-consciousness and learns to admire and love Elizabeth for her strong character.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work