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Pride and prejudice- how do pride and prejudice affects the relationship between Darcy & Elizabeth

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Introduction

Pride and prejudice- how do pride and prejudice affects the relationship between Darcy & Elizabeth Jane Austen was an English author who wrote Pride and prejudice and many other novels but Pride and Prejudice is claimed to be the most popular. Her early writings began in 1787 and ended in 1793.Jane Austen was born on the 16th of December in 1775 at Steventon Rectory Hampshire. She lived from 1775 to 1817 and was born the seventh child in a family of eight and Jane was mostly attached to her sister Cassandra. Jane's first novel, Sense and Sensibility began as a novel-in-letters called "Elinor and Marianne." These letters may reflect the relationship between Jane and her sister Cassandra. It is well documented that Jane and Cassandra were extremely close as children. When they grew older the two kept in touch by writing each other letters on a daily basis. Cassandra destroyed many of letters of correspondence with Jane to protect her privacy following her death. In 1817 Jane's recent run of good fortune came to an end. Her health grew worse as throughout the year from what we now know was Addison's disease; she passed away on July 18 of that year. I think that Jane Austen was trying to tell the audience about human relationships and I also think that the purpose of this novel was to show the ups and downs of human relationships. The subject Human relationships is very interesting, this is because certain people relate to it in different ways. Some people may relate to it as cunning and bitterly whereas others may enjoy it and relate to it in different points of views. I also feel that Jane Austen was telling us how the lifestyles and the roles of society of the men and women in the early nineteenth century. After reading the novel and watching the film of pride and prejudice I noticed that men seemed to have worked at times according to their income and status. ...read more.

Middle

I think that if Darcy came and spoke more appropriately things would have been more differently to Darcy's proposal. Darcy's behaviour makes the situation worse. My evidence to support this is: "after a silence of several minutes, he came towards her in an agitated manner" and he also says "could you expect me to rejoice in your inferior connections?" As he is proposing to her, Elizabeth can tell he has "no doubt of favourable answer. In spite of the fact that Elizabeth has not shown any partiality or affection toward him at all, he assumes that she will accept his proposal simply because of his great wealth and rank. Further, his strong class prejudices are shown in the way in which he speaks at length about the inferiority of her connections and his desire to avoid proposing to her because of them. Even worse is his insensitivity to her in spelling out these objections in such a tactless manner. Elizabeth's comment to him--"had you acted in a more gentlemanlike manner"--makes him start, and as will be seen later in the novel, has a profound effect on him. Darcy had made the situation worse by 'controlling his tongue'; he may have stood a chance. I think that Elizabeth already knew what her opinion of Darcy was. I know this because she says "your character was unfolded in the recital which I received many months ago from Mr.Wickham", which is enough to see that she had an opinion of him. Elizabeth also say's "I had not known u a month before I felt you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed upon to marry". This is enough to know that Darcy did not stand a chance of persuading Elizabeth to love him. In chapter 35 Elizabeth takes a walk and runs into Darcy, who gives her a letter. He walks away, and Elizabeth begins to read. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that it is realistic because they both see that they find each other attractive and it develops as time goes by. In the end it is like a fairy tale and they live happily ever after but you would not have thought this in the beginning. I think that Jane Austen is trying to say about relationships is that its concerning the effects of the characters first impressions, that is their prejudice. The importance of love and equality in a relationship is continually stressed throughout the novel as the reader is shown the alternatives and the negative and positive consequences of marriage and shows that love existed. She also shows that at the end of the novel, when Darcy and Elizabeth are married, Darcy's sister Georgiana is amazed that Elizabeth can tease Darcy and make him laugh at himself- a privilege, as Jane Austen points out, that a wife may have but not a younger sister. In this final subtle touch Jane Austen shows her mastery of the art of relationships. In the course of the novel, Jane Austen shows how several other marriages work. Some are happy, some not, and no two are alike. In a society in which marriage was so important to women- and to men- the qualities that make a marriage succeed are quite a serious matter. Jane Austen treats the subject with Comedy, but underneath the comic surface she is very serious. Notice, as you read what qualities she shows us as good and bad in a marriage. It seems that the success of a marriage in Austen's would- as perhaps in ours- depends on the characters of the married pair and the motives that brought them together in the first place. I agree with all this because it touches on themes of class, social behavior, and family relationships. It's a peek into a world that in some ways is nothing like ours, but it contains truths which seem to apply in any world. Also many people can relate to it in their own ways. By FOUZI ABDIWAHID 11X1 . ...read more.

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