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Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen - Look closely at the proposals of marriage received by Elizabeth Bennet from Mr Collins and Mr Darcy

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen Look closely at the proposals of marriage received by Elizabeth Bennet from Mr Collins and Mr Darcy, consider the following: * The character of each man * His social and cultural background and how this influences the way in which he proposes * The proposal itself * The reaction to rejection and subsequent behaviour of each man Pride and Prejudice is an enduringly popular 19th century novel written by the English author Jane Austen. The general theme through this book is marriage as it focuses mainly upon different types of marriage and the proposals leading up to them. In Pride and prejudice there are at least eight different marriages. The main marriage is Mr and Mrs Bennet's. Their marriage was based upon youthful infatuations. Mr Bennet chose to marry Mrs Bennet because she was good looking. This isn't why you should choose to marry someone. You should marry someone because you have similar interests or you have things in common, you should love them for who they are and you should love their personality. As Mr Bennet soon found out that there was more to Mrs Bennet than her looks, what lies beneath Mrs Bennet's looks is a personality held together with opinionated expressions and stubbornness. This is an example of marriage, which Mr Bennet wants his daughters to learn from. The Bennet family consist of Mr and Mrs Bennet and their five girls, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Lydia and Kitty. ...read more.

Middle

He basically says here that no matter what you say Lizzy I have the authority by your parents to marry you and so they shall make you marry me! Lizzy then walks out the door. Mr Collins' overall proposal was based upon self-flattery and self-importance; he had no real feelings for Lizzy and had no real intention of marrying her for the right reasons. Mr Collins doesn't take the rejection well, he expected Lizzy to say yes to his proposal. He therefore then storms out of the house and goes off to find another wife. The next time Lizzy talks with him she finds out that he proposed to her good friend Charlotte Lucas, and she accepted the offer. They were soon married. Mr Darcy is a very well to do man, of very good wealth and importance. He is a caring, proud and very private man; he has his own estate and is very well known within the first class. The first time he met Elizabeth was at a local ball. He would not dance with her because she was not pretty enough; Elizabeth overheard him say this to Mr Bingley and so does not like him. She also doesn't like Darcy because of what he did to her sister Jane (tried to break Jane and Bingley up) and because of what Whickham has said about him. Mr Darcy soon changes his views on Elizabeth after their second meeting at Mr and Mrs Collins' house when he realises he actually loves her and that she has a good personality and is intelligent unlike the other girls around him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Her overall judgement was very good, you should never settle for second best and you shouldn't let your pride or prejudices stand in the way. Elizabeth and Darcy's marriage is very different to the Collinses as Charlotte has to put a lot of effort into keeping her husband happy, she of course has to visit and please his patroness, and keep up with the housework. Lizzy however doesn't need to do any of that as she can stand to be around Darcy. Charlotte is very crafty in how she deals with her husband e.g. Mr Collins offered her a any room in the house, she chose a small room at the back of the house instead of the large living room at the front of the house that he recommended her to have, why? Well she figured out that Mr Collins would be constantly on the look out for Lady Catherine and so would be in the Front room all the time looking out of the window, pestering her and so if she takes the small room at the back she can have the peace and quiet she needs instead of him pestering her. This is how Mr and Mrs Collins actually stay married, Charlotte knows how to handle her husband whereas Lizzy doesn't need to worry about that as she genuinely loves Darcy, they actually have things in common. Elizabeth and Darcy's marriage lasts long and is happy because they have learnt from the failures of others. ...read more.

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