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Pride and Prejudice, there are many pairs of characters who exhibit interesting characteristics within their marriages.Two couples whose relationships are particularly worthy of note are those of Darcy and Elizabeth and Charlotte and Mr. Collins.

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice In the novel, Pride and Prejudice, there are many pairs of characters who exhibit interesting characteristics within their marriages.Two couples whose relationships are particularly worthy of note are those of Darcy and Elizabeth and Charlotte and Mr. Collins. The 19th century English idea of the urgency for a woman to marry well-off in society is a reoccurring theme throughout the novel. Mr. Collins and Charlotte's marriage perfectly exemplifies how women hastily marry wealthy men to avoid societal embarrassment of being an unmarried old lady. The marriage of Darcy and Elizabeth contrasts greatly with that of Collins and Charlotte in that a man of great wealth and prestige would marry out of love instead of worrying about societal rank. The relationship between Mr. Collins and Charlotte began after Elizabeth refused Mr. Collin's marriage proposal. Mr. Collins is a pompous and arrogant man who will inherit the Bennet estate. ...read more.

Middle

It is quite obvious that the marriage between Charlotte and Collins is not one based on love. Charlotte states that she "accepted Mr. Collins solely from the pure and disinterested desire of an establishment." Just because Collins and Charlotte are married does not mean they are meant to be together. The relationship is purely based on the selfishness of both Charlotte and Collins. Collins is in desperate search of a wife and after Elizabeth quickly rejects him he quickly moves on to Charlotte. Charlotte, in desperate need to marry a rich man quickly accepts the proposal. This proves that these two are ill-suited because they are not in the marriage for love; they are marrying each other for their own benefits, fostered by the pressures of their society. The marriage between Darcy and Elizabeth occurred under quite different circumstances than those of Charlotte and Collins. In the beginning of the novel, Elizabeth had great distaste for Darcy after the ball at Meryton when he refuses to dance with Elizabeth because she is "not handsome enough" to tempt him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Darcy and Elizabeth's relationship does not resemble the typical 19th century relationship in that it is based on actual love and not on social acceptance. Darcy could have easily married someone like Ms. Bingley who would be accepted by the surrounding community as a suitable wife. But instead he trusted his heart and pursued Elizabeth until she finally came around to the point where they found mutual love. Darcy's character changed drastically throughout the novel. He began as an egotistical man and by the end of the novel displayed many characteristics of selflessness. He acted in a altruistic manner when he voluntarily paid for Lydia's wedding to save her reputation and stuck up for the Bennet family when Lady Catherine and others were talking poorly of the Bennets. Elizabeth was able to overcome her judgments of Darcy and was able to see him for the real person he was. Darcy was able to overcome his pride and the pressures of society to marry a socially acceptable woman and marry Elizabeth because he loved her. ...read more.

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